Linked Events

  • "Murder, My Sweet" at Loew's J: 04-21-2017
  • "The Blue Dahlia"at Loew's Jersey: 04-22-2017
  • "Body Heat" On Screen at Loew's Jersey: 04-22-2017

Author Topic: Film Noir weekend at Loew's Jersey  (Read 575 times)

Offline LoewsJ

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"Body Heat" in 35mm part of Film Noir at Loew's Jersey
« Reply #3 on: 04-15-2017, 06:14pm »
Saturday, April 22 at 8:30PM
"Body Heat"  Starring  William Hurt, Kathleen Turner,  Richard Crenna, Ted Danson.  Directed by Lawrence Kasdan.  1981  115mins  Color  Rated R  In 35mm.


For those who think Film Noir is buried in the B&W of the 1940s – think again.  It may be colorful, but there’s also plenty of Noir’s signature mix of simmering heat and cold calculation in this classic from the 1980s.  Kathleen Turner plays a devious wife who spins a web that traps a naďve, mesmerized lawyer (William Hurt) in a scheme to kill her husband.  Writer-director Lawrence Kasdan, in his directorial debut, keeps the suspense and eroticism at full power, with plot twists aplenty in what is very satisfying reworking of the landmark Noir movie “Double Indemnity” – scripted by Raymond Chandler.  He expertly uses the heat of the coastal Florida milieu; the film practically sweats.  But the local weather and stuffy interiors of this Deep South Noir are only part of the reason it feels so hot:  Turner is so sultry that it's hard to imagine this was her first starring role. The film launched her career and Kasdan’s and jump-started a Noir revival that had begun with “Chinatown” in 1974. Ted Danson, Mickey Rourke, and Richard Crenna provide solid support.

$8 Adults / $6 Seniors & Kids

Combo prices for seeing more than one film in a weekend series.  Also being shown in this series: "Murder, My Sweet" April 21 at 8PM, and "The Blue Dahlia" April 22 at 6:30PM; both in 35mm.

Live entrance music on the Loew’s Wonder Pipe Organ before most screenings.

At the Landmark Loew's Jersey Theatre, 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ  (201) 798-6055  www.loewsjersey.org.  Email: loewsjersey@gmail.com  www.facebook.com/landmarkloewsjersey/

The Landmark Loew's Jersey is easily reached by car and mass transit from throughout the New York & New Jersey area.  We are located directly across JFK Blvd from the JSQ PATH Station with trains to and from the World Trade Center and 33rd Street in Manhattan, as well as Newark’s Penn Station.  The Theatre is close to the NJ Turnpike & Holland Tunnel. Discounted off street parking in Square Ramp Garage. 

The Loew's is a place where the great movie going experience is still alive -- a classic movie palace, a 50 foot wide screen, and a real pipe organ for entrance music before most shows!  And whenever possible, screenings are still in 35mm.

Offline LoewsJ

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Saturday, April 22 at 6:30PM
"The Blue Dahlia"  Starring Alan Ladd, Veronica Lake,  William Bendix, Howard Da Silva.  Directed by George Marshall.  1946  96mins  B&W  In 35mm.

This neat, fast-paced perfectly cast film noir is among the best of its genre – and unique in one very notable way:  Though many of Raymond Chandler's books were turned into films (such as “Murder My Sweet” and “The Big Sleep”) and he himself adapted other writers' novels into screenplays (“Double Indemnity”, “Strangers on a Train”), “The Blue Dahlia” is the only work that he wrote directly for the screen.  No surprise, then, that the film is laden with the fast-paced dialogue, grim wit, disillusioned attitude, hard-boiled men, and mysterious women that were Chandler's hallmarks.

Alan Ladd plays Johnny Morrison, who returns from the War to find his wife Helen having a party and in the arms of another man. Johnny and Helen have a terrible fight, and she is later found dead. Pursued by the cops, and never sure if he is being set-up, Johnny enlists the aid of a woman (Veronica Lake) who is the ex-wife of Helen's lover.  Ladd and Lake were paired in seven successful films in the 1940s, and always played off of each other’s strengths well (not to mention, both were rather diminutive in height, and so were literally a perfect fit on screen) but they were never better together than here: he is at his steely, no-nonsense best, and she is, as always, the perfect femme-fatale  –  intoxicatingly seductive but with a sharp edge of mystery.  Nicely directed by George Marshall, who remarkably was most known for comedies, the film moves with great pace to an exciting, satisfying conclusion.  This was John Houseman's first success as a Hollywood producer; he was previously known for his stage productions, starting with his work with Orson Welles.  And Chandler was nominated for a second Academy Award for best screenplay (his first was “Double Indemnity”).

$8 Adults / $6 Seniors & Kids


Combo pricing for seeing more than one film in a weekend series.  Also showing as part of this series:  "Murder, My Sweet" 8PM April 21 and "Body Heat" 8:30PM April 22; both also in 35mm.

Live entrance music on the Loew’s Wonder Pipe Organ before most screenings.

At the Landmark Loew's Jersey Theatre, 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ  (201) 798-6055  www.loewsjersey.org.  Email: loewsjersey@gmail.com  www.facebook.com/landmarkloewsjersey/

The Landmark Loew's Jersey is easily reached by car and mass transit from throughout the New York & New Jersey area.  We are located directly across JFK Blvd from the JSQ PATH Station with trains to and from the World Trade Center and 33rd Street in Manhattan, as well as Newark’s Penn Station.  The Theatre is close to the NJ Turnpike & Holland Tunnel. Discounted off street parking in Square Ramp Garage. 

The Loew's is a place where the great movie going experience is still alive -- a classic movie palace, a 50 foot wide screen, and a real pipe organ for entrance music before most shows!  And whenever possible, screenings are still in 35mm.

Offline LoewsJ

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Film Noir weekend at Loew's Jersey
« Reply #1 on: 04-15-2017, 05:26pm »
Friday, April 21 at 8PM
"Murder, My Sweet"  Starring  Dick Powell, Claire Trevor, Anne Shirley.  Directed by Edward Dmytryk.  1944  95 mins  B&W  In 35mm.


Dick Powell, who had first become a star playing good guy romantic leads in early 1930s musicals such as “42nd Street”, literally turned his career around with an arresting performance as the cynical, world weary private detective Philip Marlow in this key early Film Noir based on Raymond Chandler’s “Farewell My Lovely”.  And Director Edward Dmytryk captured the wit and verbal fluency of Chandler's style more successfully than any of the other films adapted from his writing, but not scripted by him.  Through the use of voice-over narration, this sharp, skillfully made movie is able to retain the writer's vision of rot beneath the cheery surfaces of the City of Angels, as the sardonic detective keeps up a running commentary on the far-from angelic rogue’s gallery of characters.

Hired by a hulking, psychotic (Mike Mazurik) to locate his old girlfriend, Marlowe is pitched headlong into a morass of intrigue and deception. The participants include a duplicitous a glamour-girl (played by Claire Trevor), sodden slattern, suave blackmailer, and dyspeptic doctor.  At one point, the detective is railroaded into a lunatic asylum, where under the influence of drugs he experiences surrealistic delirium the like of which would not be seen on screen again until Hitchcock's “Vertigo” (1958).  The "bad" characters here are so fascinating that the two "good" characters, heroine Anne Shirley and detective Don Douglas, seem wishy-washy by comparison.

Unlike some Noirs in which the protagonist is overwhelmed by a nightmarish sense of disorientation, Chandler's detective, who seems to either get cold-cocked or drugged in every other scene, has the wit of the only sane man in a world gone mad.  Claire Trevor makes a slyly elusive femme fatale, and Powell is perfect as the snarky, semi-tough hero.  The part put him back on top of the box-office and enabled him to extend his acting career into the 1950s, which led to an even more lucrative "third life" as a powerful TV-studio executive.  Chandler's story had previously been filmed in 1942 as “The Falcon Takes Over”; it was produced for a third time, finally under the title “Farewell My Lovely”, in 1975 with Robert Mitchum as Marlowe.

$8 adults / $6 seniors & kids. 

Combo pricing for seeing more than one film in a weekend series.  Also showing in this series:  "The Blue Dahlia" 6:30PM April 22; and "Body Heat" 8:30PM April 22. Both also in 35mm.

Live entrance music on the Loew’s Wonder Pipe Organ before most screenings.

At the Landmark Loew's Jersey Theatre, 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ  (201) 798-6055  www.loewsjersey.org.  Email: loewsjersey@gmail.com  www.facebook.com/landmarkloewsjersey/

The Landmark Loew's Jersey is easily reached by car and mass transit from throughout the New York & New Jersey area.  We are located directly across JFK Blvd from the JSQ PATH Station with trains to and from the World Trade Center and 33rd Street in Manhattan, as well as Newark’s Penn Station.  The Theatre is close to the NJ Turnpike & Holland Tunnel. Discounted off street parking in Square Ramp Garage. 

The Loew's is a place where the great movie going experience is still alive -- a classic movie palace, a 50 foot wide screen, and a real pipe organ for entrance music before most shows!  And whenever possible, screenings are still in 35mm.

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Film Noir weekend at Loew's Jersey
« Reply #1 on: 04-15-2017, 05:26pm »