Author Topic: If you don't like my fire, don't come around, cuz I am gonna burn one down  (Read 47385 times)

Offline TheFang

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You know, I'm really glad that NJ passed this law, it's important to help people who are sick and have our laws more closely reflect reality. But I saw this quote in the NYT article about this passing and something in it really stuck out at me:

Quote
“It’s nice to finally see a day when democracy helps heal people,” said Charles Kwiatkowski, 38, one of dozens of patients who rallied at the State House before the vote and broke into applause when the lawmakers approved the measure.


So, a few dozen folks show up and they pass the medical marijuana bill, hundreds show up in support of gay marriage and most of them can't be bothered to even vote. It's just interesting to see the things that politicians in NJ consider safe things to vote on and for. I just wish we could have both.
"I can't help it, I'm a greedy slob. It's my hobby." -- D.D.

Offline jcpeace

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2 grams a month? How much is that? Like two skinny joints? That's only enough for one weekend if you don't share! How are you supposed get high the rest of the month? Buy it on the street like some common criminal?




this is approximately 2 grams. from what i've been told from experts in the field, the medical stuff is super duper strong.
i guess it all depends on the illness  ;)
"If your children ever find out how lame you really are, they'll murder you in your sleep." Frank Zappa (1965)

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Online fasteddie

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2 grams a month? How much is that? Like two skinny joints? That's only enough for one weekend if you don't share! How are you supposed get high the rest of the month? Buy it on the street like some common criminal?

Offline jcpeace

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Health and fitness, Statehouse »

Assembly approves medical marijuana bill


By Melissa Hayes/The Jersey Journal[

January 11, 2010, 3:33PM

The state Assembly today approved The Compassionate Use of Medical Marijuana Act.In a 48 to 14 vote the state Assembly today approved the Compassionate Use of Medical Marijuana Act.

The bill allows residents with certain illnesses, including Lou Gehrig's disease and muscular dystrophy, to obtain up to 2 grams of marijuana each month from six facilities across the state.

The legislation heads back to the Senate for a vote.

Among the bill's sponsors are Sen. Sandra Cunningham, D-Jersey City, Sen. Brian Stack, D-Union City and Assemblyman Vincent Prieto, D-Secaucus.

Before the vote Assemblyman Reed Gusciora, D-Princeton, noted that it will be the strictest legalized marijuana bill in the United States.

"We have a good bill that will be very strict and will not decriminalize marijuana, but will allow doctors to prescribe the best treatment for their patients," he said.
"If your children ever find out how lame you really are, they'll murder you in your sleep." Frank Zappa (1965)

TheFang: Did you know they were made in chicken eggs! Oh no! Not chickens.

AmbushBug

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Assembly approves ending mandatroy prison sentences
« Reply #34 on: 01-07-2010, 04:09pm »
N.J. Assembly approves ending mandatroy prison sentences for school zone drug offenses

By Chris Megerian/Statehouse Bureau
January 07, 2010, 3:53PM

TRENTON -- People arrested for some drug offenses near schools should no longer face mandatory prison sentences, lawmakers decided today.

Assembly members voted 46-30 to send the bill (A2762) to the governor's desk for final approval.

The state has imposed mandatory prison terms of one to three years for people caught dealing drugs within 1,000 feet of a school since 1987.

“The mandatory minimum sentencing the zones require has effectively created two different sentences for the same crime, depending on where an individual lives," Assemblywoman Bonnie Watson Coleman (D-Mercer) said in a statement. "This is geographic discrimination at its most basic."

Supporters of the bill say those sentences have unnecessarily stuffed New Jersey prisons with nonviolent offenders who deserve probation or access to drug treatment programs.

Almost 70 percent of the 6,720 drug offenders serving time in state prisons have mandatory minimum sentences, according to the Department of Corrections.


The bill passed yesterday would allow judges to reduce the required minimum sentence or impose probation, depending on whether the offense occurred when school was in session, its proximity to school grounds, and if children were present.

Sentences could not be reduced if the offense took place on school grounds or if it involved violence or a gun.

In addition, the bill will allow current inmates to appeal the mandatory minimum sentences they’ve already received.

“This is a progressive solution to a complex problem,” Assemblyman Gordon Johnson (D-Bergen) said in a statement.

The bill passed 24-11 in the Senate on Dec. 10, then returned to the Assembly for final approval today.

Note: MCA, I'm not sure if I put this in the right thread. Do we have some other crime/legislation thread it would fit better in?

Online MÇA

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New Jersey Likely Next to Legalize Medical Marijuana
« Reply #33 on: 12-01-2009, 12:12pm »
New Jersey Likely Next to Legalize Medical Marijuana
By SUZANNE SATALINE

New Jersey is poised to become the next state to allow residents to use marijuana, when recommended by a doctor, for relief from serious diseases and medical conditions.

The state Senate has approved the bill and the state Assembly is expected to follow. The legislation would then head to the governor's office for his signature.

Gov. Jon Corzine, the Democrat who lost his re-election bid last month, has indicated he would sign the bill if it reaches his desk before he leaves office in January. It would likely be one of Mr. Corzine's last acts before relinquishing the job to Republican Chris Christie.

Mr. Christie has indicated he would be supportive of such legislation, but had concerns that one draft of a bill he read didn't have enough restrictions, a spokeswoman said.

The bill has been endorsed by the New Jersey Academy of Family Physicians and the New Jersey State Nurses Association.

Some lawmakers oppose the legislation, saying they fear the proliferation of marijuana dispensaries, as in California, where medical marijuana is legal. "It sends a mixed message to our children if you can walk down the street and see pot shops," said Republican Assemblywoman Mary Pat Angelini.

Federal law bars the use of marijuana. But legislatures in several states, including California, Colorado, Michigan, New Mexico, Rhode Island and Vermont, permit use of the drug for medical purposes. Attorney General Eric Holder said earlier this year that federal prosecutors wouldn't prosecute people complying with state medical marijuana laws.

The New Jersey bill would allow people with debilitating medical conditions to grow, possess and use marijuana for personal use, provided that a physician allows it after completing a full assessment of the patient's history and condition. The conditions that are stipulated in the Senate bill include cancer, glaucoma and human immunodeficiency viruses.

State Sen. Nicholas Scutari, a Democrat who has led the fight for the medical-marijuana bill, said that was not a final list. He said the Senate bill would have to be reconciled with whatever the Assembly might pass. (more)

Offline shahaggy

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U.S. Mellows on Medical Marijuana

WASHINGTON -- The Justice Department told federal prosecutors Monday they shouldn't pursue medical-marijuana users who comply with state laws, a step activists said may encourage more states to partially legalize the drug.

A three-page memo from Deputy Attorney General David Ogden, affirming a policy disclosed earlier this year, said it was "unlikely to be an efficient use of limited federal resources" to prosecute "individuals with cancer or other serious illnesses who use marijuana as part of a recommended treatment regimen."

The memo, sent to U.S. attorneys nationwide, said the Justice Department continued to view pot as a dangerous drug and that the new policy shouldn't prevent prosecutors from pursuing cases where state laws are being used as a cover for illegal activity.

Bruce Mirken, spokesman for the Marijuana Policy Project, said issuing formal guidelines "certainly lifts a cloud from the people in states that allow medical marijuana." Mr. Mirken, whose group opposes criminal penalties for pot use, added, "I think in terms of state legislatures and governors, as a policy matter, it gives them a great deal of reassurance" in considering medical-marijuana laws.

Rules vary in the 13 states that have medical-marijuana laws on the books, but the common theme is that seriously ill residents who have recommendations from doctors to use marijuana as a treatment shouldn't fear arrest.

Several states are considering bills that would allow the use of medical marijuana. Delaware has a bill pending, and lawmakers in New Hampshire are expected later this month to hold a vote on overriding the governor's veto of a bill they passed earlier this year.

 Some state legislators and governors have been reluctant to support medical-marijuana laws because they would put their residents at risk of federal charges.

The Obama administration's policy emerged at a February news conference in which Attorney General Eric Holder said federal raids would be stopped on medical-marijuana dispensaries in the states where voters have made medical marijuana legal. Agents had previously conducted such raids under federal law, which doesn't provide any exceptions to its pot prohibition.

A Drug Enforcement Administration spokeswoman on Monday said the agency had been adhering to the guidance since January.

James Pasco, executive director of the Fraternal Order of Police, the nation's largest law-enforcement labor organization, said the policy change -- along with other proposed changes on criminal-justice issues, such as easing the penalties on crack-cocaine crimes -- "looks like we're taking a somewhat different approach to criminal justice."

Even with the new guidelines, federal pot policy remains muddled. On a government Web site about the perils of marijuana abuse, the DEA says "smoked marijuana is not a medicine," and contrasts the federal approval process for prescription drugs with state medical-marijuana laws, which it calls "inconsistent with efforts to ensure that medications undergo the rigorous scientific scrutiny of the approval process."

The guidelines do little to clarify the situation in California, where voters approved a medical-marijuana initiative in 1996 but rules vary widely by county. The regulations allow doctors to recommend pot for medical use and enable medical caregivers to provide pot, though not for a profit.

Since then, the state has largely left interpretation of the law to local agencies. As a result, the amount of medical marijuana a person may have -- and the ways in which the drug may be sold -- isn't consistent.

Alameda County, which includes Oakland, has allowed a handful of storefront pot dispensaries. Other counties have banned storefront dispensaries or tried to close marijuana stores.

Los Angeles County has been struggling with a ballooning number of marijuana markets. District Attorney Steve Cooley said last week that most, and perhaps all, of the hundreds of dispensaries there violate state law. Los Angeles has banned new medical-marijuana dispensaries, but on Monday a Superior Court judge there issued an injunction against the ban in one such case.

—John Emshwiller contributed to this article.
Write to Gary Fields at gary.fields@wsj.com and Justin Scheck at justin.scheck@wsj.com


http://online.wsj.com/article/SB125595221988793895.html
[04:53 PM] Soshin: I don't think I've ever had fig spread Darna but I like figs and they make my sphincter sing power ballads

[12:48 PM] Bobblehead: Yo, you know I'm really happy for you and Ima let you finish, but soshin had one of the best meercat shouts of all time

[10:23 PM] skwirrlking: you submitting darna for beards eating cupcakes - mca?

[03:24 PM] Darna: [03:22 PM] jeht'aimeu: skw, you are climbing up my pole as well... 

[02:28 PM] propscene: I DPON"T MEAN I LOVE YOU DEEP INSIDE AS MUCH AS I LOVE HIM DEEP INSIDE OH GOD

[12:58 PM] nikki: i feel like i should like the opposite of whatever jehu says

Offline TheFang

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Good on the Star Ledger for actually getting voices on the pro-reform side, not just people saying that it will harm the childrens!



http://videos.nj.com/star-ledger/2009/09/new_jersey_considers_a_medical.html
"I can't help it, I'm a greedy slob. It's my hobby." -- D.D.


Offline skwirrlking

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that should help spring break traffic

Offline TheFang

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Mexico Legalizes Drug Possession

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Published: August 21, 2009

MEXICO CITY (AP) — Mexico enacted a controversial law on Thursday decriminalizing possession of small amounts of marijuana, cocaine, heroin and other drugs while encouraging government-financed treatment for drug dependency free of charge.

The law sets out maximum “personal use” amounts for drugs, also including LSD and methamphetamine. People detained with those quantities will no longer face criminal prosecution; the law goes into effect on Friday.

Anyone caught with drug amounts under the personal-use limit will be encouraged to seek treatment, and for those caught a third time treatment is mandatory — although no penalties for noncompliance are specified.

Mexican authorities said the change only recognized the longstanding practice here of not prosecuting people caught with small amounts of drugs.

The maximum amount of marijuana considered to be for “personal use” under the new law is 5 grams — the equivalent of about four marijuana cigarettes. Other limits are half a gram of cocaine, 50 milligrams of heroin, 40 milligrams for methamphetamine and 0.015 milligrams of LSD.

President Felipe Calderón waited months before approving the law.
"I can't help it, I'm a greedy slob. It's my hobby." -- D.D.

Offline shahaggy

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RI Senate approves
marijuana stores
Would enable patients to get medical
marijuana
Updated: Wednesday, 10 Jun 2009, 11:03 AM EDT
Published : Tuesday, 09 Jun 2009, 5:35 PM EDT

Nancy Krause
PROVIDENCE, R.I. (WPRI) - A bill that would allow nonprofit stores in Rhode Island to sell marijuana to medical patients is headed to the governor's desk. The state Senate passed the bill Tuesday afternoon by a 30-2 margin.

The bill has already passed the House and now heads to Governor Donald Carcieri for approval. The governor vetoed similar legislation last year.

If it becomes law, the bill would allow so-called compassion centers to sell marijuana to registered patients with debilitating illnesses. Right now, 680 patients are registered with the Department of Health's medical marijuana program.

State lawmakers approved the use of medical marijuana in 2006, however they never legalized the sale of the drug. Under the current bill, Rhode Island would be the third state in the country and the first on the East Coast to approve marijuana dispensaries for medical patients.

“Sick patients and their caregivers shouldn’t have to risk their safety and deal with criminals to get the relief they need,” said bill sponsor Senator Rhode Perry (D-Dist. 3, Providence). “Rhode Island was compassionate enough a few years ago to recognize the benefit of marijuana for those who are suffering, and I’m proud that we’re now taking the next logical and necessary step and recognizing that patients need a safe, legal means to get it.”

Governor Carcieri has a week to either sign the legislation or veto it. If he does nothing, the bill will automatically become law without his signature. The legislation passed each chamber with significantly more than the three-fifths majority necessary to override a veto.

[04:53 PM] Soshin: I don't think I've ever had fig spread Darna but I like figs and they make my sphincter sing power ballads

[12:48 PM] Bobblehead: Yo, you know I'm really happy for you and Ima let you finish, but soshin had one of the best meercat shouts of all time

[10:23 PM] skwirrlking: you submitting darna for beards eating cupcakes - mca?

[03:24 PM] Darna: [03:22 PM] jeht'aimeu: skw, you are climbing up my pole as well... 

[02:28 PM] propscene: I DPON"T MEAN I LOVE YOU DEEP INSIDE AS MUCH AS I LOVE HIM DEEP INSIDE OH GOD

[12:58 PM] nikki: i feel like i should like the opposite of whatever jehu says

Offline shahaggy

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[04:53 PM] Soshin: I don't think I've ever had fig spread Darna but I like figs and they make my sphincter sing power ballads

[12:48 PM] Bobblehead: Yo, you know I'm really happy for you and Ima let you finish, but soshin had one of the best meercat shouts of all time

[10:23 PM] skwirrlking: you submitting darna for beards eating cupcakes - mca?

[03:24 PM] Darna: [03:22 PM] jeht'aimeu: skw, you are climbing up my pole as well... 

[02:28 PM] propscene: I DPON"T MEAN I LOVE YOU DEEP INSIDE AS MUCH AS I LOVE HIM DEEP INSIDE OH GOD

[12:58 PM] nikki: i feel like i should like the opposite of whatever jehu says

Offline TheFang

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Hey peoples, call your assembly members. NJ's medical marijuana bill will be before committee on THURSDAY (yes, tomorrow), it's already passed the senate by a wide margin. Now, I know none of our local folks are on said committee, but we can still show then that we support this bill. Come on, lets do this while we still have a man for governor who said he'd sign it without question.



-----------

Medical marijuana bill to appear before New Jersey Assembly committee Thursday
by Stephen J. Novak
Monday June 01, 2009, 4:29 PM

The state Assembly Health and Senior Services Committee is scheduled to vote on a medical marijuana bill Thursday, according to a legislative calendar.

The New Jersey Compassionate Use Medical Marijuana Act was passed by the state Senate in February by a 22-16 vote.

The committee can amend the bill and allow it to move to the full Assembly for a vote, which would move New Jersey closer to becoming the 14th state to legalize marijuana for medical purposes. Gov. Jon S. Corzine has said he will sign the bill.

Under the bill, patients suffering from life-threatening or debilitating illnesses could be qualified to use medical marijuana with a doctor's recommendation. Patients would need to register with the New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, and would receive registration cards indicating that they are allowed to legally possess and use medical marijuana.

    "Our elected officials need to pass this important legislation," said Roseanne Scotti, director of Drug Policy Alliance New Jersey, in a news release today. "New Jerseyans believe that if they or a loved one have a serious illness, and are suffering, that they should have every option for relieving that suffering."

There is some division in medical and law enforcement communities about the bill, though a majority of area police officials seem to be against it.

    "Taking something that is illegal for the majority of the population and making it legal for a very small portion of the population is going to make it hard for the officer on the street," Greenwich Township Police Chief Rich Guzzo said not long after the Senate's passage. "It's going to be a courtroom nightmare."
"I can't help it, I'm a greedy slob. It's my hobby." -- D.D.

Offline TheFang

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It must be 4:20, the NY Times is acknowledging that marijuana exists.

Marijuana Advocates Point to Signs of Change

By JESSE McKINLEY

SAN FRANCISCO — On Monday, somewhere in New York City, 420 people will gather for High Times magazine’s annual beauty pageant, a secretly located and sold-out event that its sponsor says will “turn the Big Apple into the Baked Apple and help us usher in a new era of marijuana freedom in America.”

They will not be the only ones partaking: April 20 has long been an unofficial day of celebration for marijuana fans, an occasion for campus smoke-outs, concerts and cannabis festivals. But some advocates of legal marijuana say this year’s “high holiday” carries extra significance as they sense increasing momentum toward acceptance of the drug, either as medicine or entertainment.

“It is the biggest moment yet,” said Ethan Nadelmann, the founder and executive director of the Drug Policy Alliance in Washington, who cited several national polls showing growing support for legalization. “There’s a sense that the notion of legalizing marijuana is starting to cross the fringes into mainstream debate.”

For Mr. Nadelmann and others like him, the signs of change are everywhere, from the nation’s statehouses — where more than a dozen legislatures have taken up measures to allow some medical use of marijuana or some easing of penalties for recreational use — to its swimming pools, where an admission of marijuana use by the Olympic gold medalist Michael Phelps was largely forgiven with a shrug.

Long stigmatized as political poison, the marijuana movement has found new allies in prominent politicians, including Representatives Barney Frank, Democrat of Massachusetts, and Ron Paul, Republican of Texas, who co-wrote a bill last year to decrease federal penalties for possession and to give medical users new protections.

The bill failed, but with the recession prompting bulging budget deficits, some legislators in California and Massachusetts have gone further, suggesting that the drug could be legalized and taxed, a concept that has intrigued even such ideologically opposed pundits as Glenn Beck of Fox News and Jack Cafferty of CNN.

“Look, I’m a libertarian,” Mr. Beck said on his Feb. 26 program. “You want to legalize marijuana, you want to legalize drugs — that’s fine.”

All of which has longtime proponents of the drug feeling oddly optimistic and even overexposed.

“We’ve been on national cable news more in the first three months than we typically are in an entire year,” said Bruce Mirken, the director of communications for the Marijuana Policy Project, a reform group based in Washington. “And any time you’ve got Glenn Beck and Barney Frank agreeing on something, it’s either a sign that change is impending or that the end times are here.”

Beneficiaries of the moment include Norml, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, which advocates legalization, and other groups like it. Norml says that its Web traffic and donations (sometimes in $4.20 increments) have surged, and that it will begin a television advertising campaign on Monday, which concludes with a plea, and an homage, to President Obama.

“Legalization,” the advertisement says, “yes we can!”

That seems unlikely anytime soon. In a visit last week to Mexico, where drug violence has claimed thousands of lives and threatened to spill across the border, Mr. Obama said the United States must work to curb demand for drugs.

Still, pro-marijuana groups have applauded recent remarks by Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr., who suggested that federal law enforcement resources would not be used to pursue legitimate medical marijuana users and outlets in California and a dozen other states that allow medical use of the drug. Court battles are also percolating. The United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit heard arguments last Tuesday in San Francisco in a 2007 lawsuit challenging the government’s official skepticism about medical uses of the drug.

But Allen F. St. Pierre, the executive director of Norml, said he had cautioned supporters that any legal changes that might occur would probably be incremental.

“The balancing act this year is trying to get our most active, most vocal supporters to be more realistic in their expectations in what the Obama administration is going to do,” Mr. St. Pierre said.

For fans of the drug, perhaps the biggest indicator of changing attitudes is how widespread the observance of April 20 has become, including its use in marketing campaigns for stoner-movie openings (like last year’s “Harold & Kumar Escape from Guantánamo Bay”) and as a peg for marijuana-related television programming (like the G4 network’s prime-time double bill Monday of “Super High Me” and “Half Baked”).

Events tied to April 20 have “reached the tipping point in the last few years after being a completely underground phenomenon for a long time,” said Steven Hager, the creative director and former editor of High Times. “And I think that’s symptomatic of the fact that people’s perception of marijuana is reaching a tipping point.”

Mr. Hager said the significance of April 20 dates to a ritual begun in the early 1970s in which a group of Northern California teenagers smoked marijuana every day at 4:20 p.m. Word of the ritual spread and expanded to a yearly event in various places. Soon, marijuana aficionados were using “420” as a code for smoking and using it as a sign-off on fliers for concerts where the drug would be plentiful.

In recent years, the April 20 events have become so widespread that several colleges have urged students to just say no. At the University of Colorado, Boulder, where thousands of students regularly use the day to light up in the quad, administrators sent an e-mail message this month pleading with students not to “participate in unlawful activity that debases the reputation of your university and degree.”

A similar warning was sent to students at the University of California, Santa Cruz — home of the Grateful Dead archives — which banned overnight guests at residence halls leading up to April 20.

None of which, of course, is expected to discourage the dozens of parties — large and small — planned for Monday, including the top-secret crowning of Ms. High Times.

In San Francisco, meanwhile, where a city supervisor, Ross Mirkarimi, suggested last week that the city should consider getting into the medical marijuana business as a provider, big crowds are expected to turn out at places like Hippie Hill, a drum-happy glade in Golden Gate Park.

A cloud of pungent smoke is also expected to be thick at concerts like one planned at the Fillmore rock club, where the outspoken pro-marijuana hip-hop group Cypress Hill is expected to take the stage at 4:20 p.m.

“You can see twice the amount of smoke as you do at a regular show,” said B-Real, a rapper in the group. “And it’s a great fragrance.”
"I can't help it, I'm a greedy slob. It's my hobby." -- D.D.

Offline TheFang

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Some people are more then happy to pay more taxes:

A Different Kind of ‘Tea Party’


What would you do with an extra $14 billion dollars? Members of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML) want to find out.

Earlier this morning, the organization presented a mock check to the U.S Treasury Department in the sum of $14 billion dollars. The check total represents the combined savings and tax revenues that would be generated by regulating the sale and production of cannabis like alcohol

“We represent the millions of otherwise law-abiding cannabis consumers who are ready, willing, vocal and able to contribute needed tax revenue to America’s struggling economy,” NORML Executive Director Allen St. Pierre said at a press conference at the steps of the general post office in New York City. “All we ask in exchange for our $14 billion is that our government respects our decision to use marijuana privately and responsibly.”

But it’s not just NORML that is calling on lawmakers to tax and regulate marijuana. In today’s economic climate, the question is: who isn’t?

Late last month, during President Barack Obama’s first-ever Internet Town Hall, questions pertaining to whether legalizing marijuana like alcohol could help boost the economy received more votes from the public than did any other topic. The questions’ popularity — and the President’s half-hearted reply (”No,” he laughed.) — stimulated a torrent of mainstream media attention. In the past two weeks alone, commentators like David Sirota (The Nation), Kathleen Parker (Washington Post), Paul Jacob (TownHall.com), Clarence Page (Chicago Tribune), and Jack Cafferty (CNN) have all expressed sympathy for regulating pot. Even Joe Klein at Time Magazine weighed in on the issue, writing this month that “legalizing marijuana makes sense.”

It makes cents too.

According to a 2005 analysis by Harvard University senior lecturer Jeffrey Miron — and endorsed by over 500 distinguished economists — replacing pot prohibition with a system of taxation and regulation similar to that used for alcohol would produce combined savings and tax revenues of between $10 billion and $14 billion per year.

A separate economic analysis, conducted by George Mason University professor Jon Gettman in 2007, estimates that the total amount of tax revenue derived from cannabis could be far higher. According to Gettman, the retail value of the total U.S. marijuana market now stands at a whopping $113 billion per year. Using standard tax percentages obtained from the Office of Management and Budget, he calculates that the diversion of this market from the taxable economy deprives taxpayers of $31.1 billion annually.

For local and state governments, taxing and regulating pot could help reduce growing deficits. For instance, in Oakland, California the City Council gave preliminary approval last week to a proposal to raise the business tax paid by city-licensed medical marijuana dispensary operators. Council members estimate that the new tax will raise anywhere from $400,000 to a “couple million” dollars annually.

Likewise, lawmakers in Massachusetts and California are debating statewide measures to tax and regulate the production and sale of cannabis to adults. Both state proposals would impose a fixed excise tax on the retail production of marijuana — non-retail cultivation would remain untaxed — as well as sales taxes on the commercial sale of the drug to anyone 21 years and older.

“The revenue effect of the proposed Act is an estimated annual revenue gain of $1.339 billion,” says the California State Board of Equalization and Taxation, which is backing the measure. A more liberal economic assessment performed by California NORML’s Dr. Dale Gieringer estimates that the annual revenues raised via the advent of a legal cannabis industry in California could be far higher.

“A comparable example would be California’s wine industry,” Gieringer wrote in a 2009 report. “With $12.3 billion in retail sales, the wine industry generates 309,000 jobs, $10.1 billion in wages, and $2 billion in tourist expenditures. Extrapolating these figures to a legal marijuana market, … one might expect $12 to $18 billion in total economic activity, with 60,000 to 110,000 new jobs created, and $2.5 to $3.5 billion in legal wages, which would generate additional income and business taxes for the state.”

Finally, taxing and regulating cannabis would have the added bonus of taking the production and trafficking of pot out of the hands of criminal enterprises and, increasingly, drug gangs. According to the Associated Press, marijuana is the “biggest source of income” for Mexican drug cartels. Legalizing pot would eliminate this primary income source for these cartels and, in turn, eliminate much of the growing violence and turf battles that currently surround the drug’s illegal importation from Mexico.

Any way you look at it, legalizing cannabis just “makes sense.” So why aren’t we doing it?

Paul Armentano is the Deputy Director of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws. He is the co-author of the forthcoming book, Marijuana is Safer: So Why Are We Driving People to Drink? (Chelsea Green, 2009).
"I can't help it, I'm a greedy slob. It's my hobby." -- D.D.

Offline Soshin

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Bakerman is baking bread.  Best Camberwell Carrot accompanying video of all time.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/ymdssZOAx3Q&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/ymdssZOAx3Q&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1</a>
« Last Edit: 03-28-2009, 12:40pm by Soshin »
"god hates you. you will all go to yuppie hell. in yuppie hell there is no starbucks or hole foods or sushi bar. in yuppie hell you will work 16 hours a day in a bodega. in yuppie hell your car will not start when the sweeper is coming down the street. in yuppie hell your doorman will terrorize you and have sex with your wife or husband...when you are at work....in the bodega. in yuppie hell you will go to the laundromat and lose your last quarter in a broken washing machine. in yuppie hell you will buy all your food and clothing at the 99 cent store. in yuppie hell there are no cell phones, you will use a pay phone. a filthy pay phone".      -   Cat_Man Dude

Offline Soshin

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Watch the buddha rise!!!

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/_8NNmJbpRXs&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/_8NNmJbpRXs&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1</a>
"god hates you. you will all go to yuppie hell. in yuppie hell there is no starbucks or hole foods or sushi bar. in yuppie hell you will work 16 hours a day in a bodega. in yuppie hell your car will not start when the sweeper is coming down the street. in yuppie hell your doorman will terrorize you and have sex with your wife or husband...when you are at work....in the bodega. in yuppie hell you will go to the laundromat and lose your last quarter in a broken washing machine. in yuppie hell you will buy all your food and clothing at the 99 cent store. in yuppie hell there are no cell phones, you will use a pay phone. a filthy pay phone".      -   Cat_Man Dude

Offline duke_of_earl

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Our first Internet President?  I guess the internet is great when it gets votes, but when the voters bring up issues...eh, not so much.  IIRC, drug (leg|decrimin)alization was 3 or 4 of the top 10 questions on change.gov.  I can't seem to find the link any more due to the change.gov to whitehouse.gov shuffle...

duke

Offline jcpeace

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"If your children ever find out how lame you really are, they'll murder you in your sleep." Frank Zappa (1965)

TheFang: Did you know they were made in chicken eggs! Oh no! Not chickens.

Offline TheFang

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<a href="http://images.salon.com/video.swf?id=w-76644-2014935" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://images.salon.com/video.swf?id=w-76644-2014935</a>
"I can't help it, I'm a greedy slob. It's my hobby." -- D.D.

Offline shahaggy

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[04:53 PM] Soshin: I don't think I've ever had fig spread Darna but I like figs and they make my sphincter sing power ballads

[12:48 PM] Bobblehead: Yo, you know I'm really happy for you and Ima let you finish, but soshin had one of the best meercat shouts of all time

[10:23 PM] skwirrlking: you submitting darna for beards eating cupcakes - mca?

[03:24 PM] Darna: [03:22 PM] jeht'aimeu: skw, you are climbing up my pole as well... 

[02:28 PM] propscene: I DPON"T MEAN I LOVE YOU DEEP INSIDE AS MUCH AS I LOVE HIM DEEP INSIDE OH GOD

[12:58 PM] nikki: i feel like i should like the opposite of whatever jehu says

Offline shahaggy

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[04:53 PM] Soshin: I don't think I've ever had fig spread Darna but I like figs and they make my sphincter sing power ballads

[12:48 PM] Bobblehead: Yo, you know I'm really happy for you and Ima let you finish, but soshin had one of the best meercat shouts of all time

[10:23 PM] skwirrlking: you submitting darna for beards eating cupcakes - mca?

[03:24 PM] Darna: [03:22 PM] jeht'aimeu: skw, you are climbing up my pole as well... 

[02:28 PM] propscene: I DPON"T MEAN I LOVE YOU DEEP INSIDE AS MUCH AS I LOVE HIM DEEP INSIDE OH GOD

[12:58 PM] nikki: i feel like i should like the opposite of whatever jehu says

Offline elgoodo

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I don't have time to read that. I'm too busy watching the Mexican border for illegals.   ::)
[06:11 PM]  fasteddie: jesus, this SB is deader than JC Vibe

Offline shahaggy

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[04:53 PM] Soshin: I don't think I've ever had fig spread Darna but I like figs and they make my sphincter sing power ballads

[12:48 PM] Bobblehead: Yo, you know I'm really happy for you and Ima let you finish, but soshin had one of the best meercat shouts of all time

[10:23 PM] skwirrlking: you submitting darna for beards eating cupcakes - mca?

[03:24 PM] Darna: [03:22 PM] jeht'aimeu: skw, you are climbing up my pole as well... 

[02:28 PM] propscene: I DPON"T MEAN I LOVE YOU DEEP INSIDE AS MUCH AS I LOVE HIM DEEP INSIDE OH GOD

[12:58 PM] nikki: i feel like i should like the opposite of whatever jehu says

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