Author Topic: NJ Gubernatorial Race  (Read 22618 times)

Online jehu

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Re: NJ Gubernatorial Race
« Reply #24 on: 10-16-2009, 11:13am »
So we are now quoting the NYPOST for stories about Corzine?  ::)

Jersey Jobs Con JobEmployment figures looking funny
By JIM GERAGHTY

Last Updated: 5:08 AM, October 16, 2009

Posted: 1:20 AM, October 16, 2009

     NEW Jersey's economy is in rotten shape. But if you want a more pre cise measurement, don't trust the state's unemployment figures.
              
With Gov. Jon Corzine in a tight race against Republican Chris Christie, Corzine's staff is pushing state workers hard to produce good news. A memo revealed this week shows the governor's deputy chief of staff, Mark Matzen, directing Cabinet members to "come up with an event or two or three that show job creation or economic development in the private sector." Matzen said the events would "get the message out" and added, "I know this is a stretch for some of you, but please be creative."
              
Just how much are state employees willing to "stretch" to help out the boss? Just how "creative" does Corzine want them to be? If the overall number is to be believed, the Garden State's unemployment rate is 9.8 percent, as bad as the national average. But how reliable are these data? Are any numbers being tweaked or massaged to reflect the preferences of the governor's re-election campaign?
              
Consider this: When he presents his monthly job report, state Labor Commissioner David J. Socolow usually offers some assessment of what's driving the state's economy, in language that sounds awfully similar to what you'd expect to hear from Corzine's campaign.
              
For example, August's press release said, "New Jersey's private-sector employment is trending in the right direction. Gov. Corzine's economic-recovery initiatives are fostering job creation, and the nation's recovery program is helping to restore economic confidence. As a result, New Jersey has laid the groundwork for a recovery marked by stronger job growth when the global recession ends."
              
Socolow's good news was that the state had gained 5,900 jobs in July, with layoffs in the public sector but more than offset by the creation of 13,000 new jobs in the private sector.
              
That's a great number for the state in ordinary circumstances but phenomenal during a recession, and in a month when the nation as a whole was still losing jobs.
              
But a funny thing happened in the nextmonth's release: The numbers for July were revised downward considerably. In fact, 7,400 of those new private-sector jobs were illusory -- with the net result that, instead of gaining jobs, the state had lost 500.
              
Yet Corzine's campaign used July's early numbers to justify commercials that his economic recovery plan was "beginning to work with thousands of new private sector jobs, bucking the national trend."
              
Now, no individual revision should raise eyebrows; every economist is entitled to change his conclusions based on a fuller set of data. But the July revision was only the most glaring example of the state's initially touting new jobs that never existed.
              
The state's estimates of how many residents were employed in the private sector were revised down in the months of April, May, June, July and August. Sometimes the revision was just a few hundred downward, sometimes a few thousand, but it was always in the same direction.
              
That is, month after month, the state has been issuing glowing job numbers that it later quietly has had to deflate. Figures that looked much better turn out to be only a little better, and figures that looked a little worse are revealed to be much worse.
              
Normally, revisions would be upward in some months, downward in others. Look at the employment numbers for Jersey's neighbors, New York and Pennsylvania, in the same months, and you'll see that exact pattern -- the revised data offer a brighter picture some months, a darker outlook others. (And credit those state agencies for offering their updates in a Joe Friday, just-the-facts tone, with no cheerleading for the incumbent governors.)
              
Corruption in New Jersey has become a dog-bites-man story. But if even economic data are subject to political manipulation, it's sunk to a new low. Perhaps New Jerseyans don't really have a state government anymore -- just a giant, taxpayer-funded Corzine re-election effort.
              
Jim Geraghty writes the Campaign Spot for National Review Online.
              
 http://www.nypost.com/p/news/opinion/opedcolumnists/jersey_jobs_con_job_ZEQuppIzFC4ZpSmXluMw9M

TheFang: yeah, i gotta agree with jehu here

Darna: we had a lovely shat with mrs binky this morning

stephen: Hmm… I'm as clueless as you are.

Darna: could someone please splain to me why a person in a gang is called a gangbanger but a gangbang has nothing to do with gang activity?

shahaggy: can't believe I'm saying this but +1 jehu

[02:58 PM] MCA: it's not stalking, it's caring enough to find out things she won't tell you herself

[01:35 PM] shahaggy: fine but jehu's correct

TheFang: as much as it pains me to say, jehu might be right.

One time, I hired a monkey to take notes for me in class. I would just sit back with my mind completely blank while the monkey scribbled on little pieces of paper. At the end of the week, the teacher said, "Class, I want you to write a pape

Offline shahaggy

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Re: NJ Gubernatorial Race
« Reply #23 on: 10-16-2009, 11:07am »
Jersey Jobs Con JobEmployment figures looking funny
By JIM GERAGHTY

Last Updated: 5:08 AM, October 16, 2009

Posted: 1:20 AM, October 16, 2009

     NEW Jersey's economy is in rotten shape. But if you want a more pre cise measurement, don't trust the state's unemployment figures.
              
With Gov. Jon Corzine in a tight race against Republican Chris Christie, Corzine's staff is pushing state workers hard to produce good news. A memo revealed this week shows the governor's deputy chief of staff, Mark Matzen, directing Cabinet members to "come up with an event or two or three that show job creation or economic development in the private sector." Matzen said the events would "get the message out" and added, "I know this is a stretch for some of you, but please be creative."
              
Just how much are state employees willing to "stretch" to help out the boss? Just how "creative" does Corzine want them to be? If the overall number is to be believed, the Garden State's unemployment rate is 9.8 percent, as bad as the national average. But how reliable are these data? Are any numbers being tweaked or massaged to reflect the preferences of the governor's re-election campaign?
              
Consider this: When he presents his monthly job report, state Labor Commissioner David J. Socolow usually offers some assessment of what's driving the state's economy, in language that sounds awfully similar to what you'd expect to hear from Corzine's campaign.
              
For example, August's press release said, "New Jersey's private-sector employment is trending in the right direction. Gov. Corzine's economic-recovery initiatives are fostering job creation, and the nation's recovery program is helping to restore economic confidence. As a result, New Jersey has laid the groundwork for a recovery marked by stronger job growth when the global recession ends."
              
Socolow's good news was that the state had gained 5,900 jobs in July, with layoffs in the public sector but more than offset by the creation of 13,000 new jobs in the private sector.
              
That's a great number for the state in ordinary circumstances but phenomenal during a recession, and in a month when the nation as a whole was still losing jobs.
              
But a funny thing happened in the nextmonth's release: The numbers for July were revised downward considerably. In fact, 7,400 of those new private-sector jobs were illusory -- with the net result that, instead of gaining jobs, the state had lost 500.
              
Yet Corzine's campaign used July's early numbers to justify commercials that his economic recovery plan was "beginning to work with thousands of new private sector jobs, bucking the national trend."
              
Now, no individual revision should raise eyebrows; every economist is entitled to change his conclusions based on a fuller set of data. But the July revision was only the most glaring example of the state's initially touting new jobs that never existed.
              
The state's estimates of how many residents were employed in the private sector were revised down in the months of April, May, June, July and August. Sometimes the revision was just a few hundred downward, sometimes a few thousand, but it was always in the same direction.
              
That is, month after month, the state has been issuing glowing job numbers that it later quietly has had to deflate. Figures that looked much better turn out to be only a little better, and figures that looked a little worse are revealed to be much worse.
              
Normally, revisions would be upward in some months, downward in others. Look at the employment numbers for Jersey's neighbors, New York and Pennsylvania, in the same months, and you'll see that exact pattern -- the revised data offer a brighter picture some months, a darker outlook others. (And credit those state agencies for offering their updates in a Joe Friday, just-the-facts tone, with no cheerleading for the incumbent governors.)
              
Corruption in New Jersey has become a dog-bites-man story. But if even economic data are subject to political manipulation, it's sunk to a new low. Perhaps New Jerseyans don't really have a state government anymore -- just a giant, taxpayer-funded Corzine re-election effort.
              
Jim Geraghty writes the Campaign Spot for National Review Online.
              
 http://www.nypost.com/p/news/opinion/opedcolumnists/jersey_jobs_con_job_ZEQuppIzFC4ZpSmXluMw9M
[04:53 PM] Soshin: I don't think I've ever had fig spread Darna but I like figs and they make my sphincter sing power ballads

[12:48 PM] Bobblehead: Yo, you know I'm really happy for you and Ima let you finish, but soshin had one of the best meercat shouts of all time

[10:23 PM] skwirrlking: you submitting darna for beards eating cupcakes - mca?

[03:24 PM] Darna: [03:22 PM] jeht'aimeu: skw, you are climbing up my pole as well... 

[02:28 PM] propscene: I DPON"T MEAN I LOVE YOU DEEP INSIDE AS MUCH AS I LOVE HIM DEEP INSIDE OH GOD

[12:58 PM] nikki: i feel like i should like the opposite of whatever jehu says

Offline TheFang

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Chris Daggett Endorsed by the Star Ledger
« Reply #22 on: 10-14-2009, 07:50pm »
There's a whole bunch of videos on the website that's an interview with Daggett by the editorial board, but I can't get them to embed. Watch it, good stuff.

Star-Ledger endorses independent Chris Daggett for N.J. governor


 By Star-Ledger Editorial Board/The Star-Led...
October 10, 2009, 5:00PM

The Star-Ledger today endorses independent candidate Chris Daggett and recommends his election as the next governor of New Jersey.

The newspaper’s decision is less a rejection of Gov. Jon Corzine and Republican Chris Christie than a repudiation of the parties they represent, both of which have forfeited any claim to the trust and confidence of the people of New Jersey. They share responsibility for the state’s current plight.

Only by breaking the hold of the Democratic and Republican mandarins on the governor’s office and putting a rein on their power will the state have any hope for the kind of change needed to halt its downward economic, political and ethical spiral.

New Jersey needs radical change in Trenton. Neither of the major parties is likely to provide it. Daggett’s election would send shock waves through New Jersey’s ossified political system and, we believe, provide a start in a new direction.

It would signal the entrenched leadership of both parties — and the interest groups they regularly represent — that an ill-served and angry electorate demands something better.

The lamentable fact is that the two parties are, themselves, little more than narrow special interests. Their competition for short-term political and/or monetary gain has jeopardized the state’s long-term economic health and left it with a tarnished national reputation.

Where the major parties have differed, their differences have been inconsequential. Where they’ve been the same, their similarities have been destructive.

They have contributed equally to gross overspending in Trenton by consistently pandering to the pay, pension and retirement policies demanded by powerful public employee unions. Democrats have financed the spree with tax hikes, Republicans with borrowed money, and both with pension-fund raids.

How do we now signal them that this has got to stop if not by rejecting their anointed candidates? How if not by electing Chris Daggett?

The most disappointing of the three candidates is Christie. Six months ago he seemed an almost certain winner, a highly successful federal prosecutor facing an embattled governor saddled with a collapsing economy and soaring budget deficits. He could run a rocking-chair campaign, it seemed, make only safe commitments, avoid controversy, and win.

Unfortunately, that’s mostly what Christie has done — a strategy that looks less promising now that his double-digit early lead has melted away.

Christie’s game plan for dealing with a looming, record budget deficit of $8 billion has been a work in progress. After pledging for months to cut taxes deeply despite the budget red ink, he disclosed Friday in an interview with The Star-Ledger’s Tom Moran that he has put most of the tax reduction on the shelf until the economy begins to recover.

But he’d still lower income taxes on the state’s wealthiest households by roughly $1 billion and restore a portion of the nearly $600 billion in property tax rebates rescinded last year — a neat trick while still balancing the budget.

Christie’s principal claim on voter support is based on his record as U.S. Attorney for New Jersey — and it’s not without merit. The Star-Ledger opposed his appointment to that post originally, only to be pleasantly surprised as Christie surrounded himself with capable, qualified people and performed well.

But his sketchy budget plans and his relative lack of familiarity with the details of state government, as evidenced in debates and before The Star-Ledger editorial board, give us pause.

Corzine is an eminently decent and likable man, and not without achievement. We especially salute his unflagging commitment to state education and his success in changing the Abbott school aid formula to ensure that money intended to help poor children follows them whether or not they live in specific districts.

But his shortcomings as a leader are serious. They’ve become all too apparent in his dealings with public employee unions, an often unruly Legislature and a Democratic Party that is, at best, an ethically compromised ship and, at worst, harbors a corrupt crew.

The governor may be the nominal leader of his party but there’s mounting evidence its commanding figure is George Norcross, an unelected South Jersey political deal-maker who’s currently rearranging the Democratic leadership in the Senate and Assembly.

Corzine is the chaplain on a pirate ship, not really its captain.

Like Christie, neither Corzine nor Daggett has adequately explained how he’d tackle the vast budget deficit. All three, to some degree, are like Dickens’ hapless Wilkins Micawber, hoping "something will turn up." But only Daggett has produced anything close to a coherent plan to cut property taxes. He’d chop them by up to $2,500 per homeowner — but only if their municipalities kept spending increases in line with the Consumer Price Index. In effect, he’d require local officials to choose between their union supporters and taxpaying voters. It’s not a panacea, but at least a start.

As for government experience, Daggett, who has a doctorate in education, has at least as much as his rivals, having worked for both Democratic and Republican governors and served as regional administrator of the federal Environmental Protection Agency. His mastery of detail is impressive.

The reservation one hears about Daggett among the surprising number who say they’d like to vote for him is that he can’t win. And, indeed, the ballot position assigned Daggett and other independents makes his task daunting. You’ll have to hunt to find him.

But the value of a vote is not limited to picking a winner. The real value lies in the signal it sends about what the voter believes is best for the city, county or state — not merely at the moment, but long-term.

We believe Daggett is best.

For disappointed Democrats and Republicans, a decision to vote for Daggett will mean a break with party loyalty — no easy thing. What we’re suggesting is a temporary suspension of that loyalty as a way to begin changing the corrosive culture of Trenton. Daggett would owe nothing to either party establishment; he’d be free to recruit best talent wherever he found it. As he told The Star-Ledger editorial board, he’d feel no obligation to honor the traditional Democratic-Republican deal that requires bipartisan balance on the Supreme Court. He’d apparently take the best he could find regardless of party affiliation — or lack thereof.

For too long, the cliche about New Jersey’s two great parties has seemed all too true — that Democrats are corrupt, Republicans incompetent. Nothing will cause them to change their ways for the better except repudiation at the polls Nov. 3.

The election of Chris Daggett would deliver that repudiation and put a highly qualified occupant in the corner office at the Statehouse.

« Last Edit: 10-14-2009, 07:54pm by TheFang »
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Offline RB

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Re: NJ Gubernatorial Race
« Reply #21 on: 10-13-2009, 06:10pm »
Chris Christie exceeded federal travel spending limits as U.S. Attorney, records show
By The Associated Press
October 13, 2009, 5:26PM



TRENTON -- Travel records show the Republican candidate for governor in New Jersey frequently exceeded federal spending guidelines on business travel while he was U.S. attorney.

Chris Christie exceeded the hotel allowance on 15 of 16 business trips last year. The records were obtained by the campaign of Christie's opponent, Gov. Jon Corzine, under the Freedom of Information Act. The campaign gave them to The Associated Press.

The vouchers show taxpayers occasionally paid for five-star hotels topping $400 a night.

Christie has campaigned on a platform of ethical integrity and cutting government waste. He said he stayed in more expensive hotels when government rates weren't available and completed paperwork justifying the expenses.

An ethics watchdog calls Christie's travel history astonishing.

Offline MÇA

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Re: NJ Gubernatorial Race
« Reply #20 on: 10-08-2009, 04:27pm »
From Democracy Corps:

"With less than a month to go before Election Day, a new survey conducted for Stan Greenberg and James Carville’s organization Democracy Corps by Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research finds that Democratic Governor Jon Corzine has now moved slightly ahead of Republican Chris Christie, after pulling into a statistical dead heat two weeks ago. Corzine now leads by 3 points, garnering 41 percent of the vote to Christie’s 38 percent and independent Chris Daggett’s 14 percent. Importantly, Corzine has now consolidated the vote among his base, crossing the 80 percent threshold among Democrats and winning more Democrats than Christie does Republicans for the first time.

Christie’s standing has declined markedly in the last two weeks, with 42 percent now rating the Republican unfavorably versus just 30 percent who rate him favorably. This net -12 point favorability rating is a 10-point decline from two weeks ago. Corzine is rated favorably by 37 percent of voters and unfavorably by 46 percent, for a net favorability rating of -9 points. [...]"
« Last Edit: 10-08-2009, 04:48pm by MCA »

Offline Soshin

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Re: NJ Gubernatorial Race
« Reply #19 on: 10-08-2009, 04:01pm »

Christie? Christie strikes me as an evil fat man. I don't like his looks. If he was a jolly fat man, I might think twice before not voting for him but being an evil fat man, he gets no consideration from me.


Someone is listening to you FE. 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/08/nyregion/08fat.html?_r=1&hpw
"god hates you. you will all go to yuppie hell. in yuppie hell there is no starbucks or hole foods or sushi bar. in yuppie hell you will work 16 hours a day in a bodega. in yuppie hell your car will not start when the sweeper is coming down the street. in yuppie hell your doorman will terrorize you and have sex with your wife or husband...when you are at work....in the bodega. in yuppie hell you will go to the laundromat and lose your last quarter in a broken washing machine. in yuppie hell you will buy all your food and clothing at the 99 cent store. in yuppie hell there are no cell phones, you will use a pay phone. a filthy pay phone".      -   Cat_Man Dude

Offline pinky

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Re: NJ Gubernatorial Race
« Reply #18 on: 10-08-2009, 02:41pm »
even though i hate corzine and never voted for him before, i will be voting for him this year and did so in this little poll.
why? because anything that pisses conservatives off and reinforces their feelings of white marginalization is a source of great entertainment and joy for me.

I love pissing people off....... ;) You sold me!
« Last Edit: 10-08-2009, 02:45pm by Pinky »

Offline jcpeace

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Re: NJ Gubernatorial Race
« Reply #17 on: 10-08-2009, 02:23pm »
even though i hate corzine and never voted for him before, i will be voting for him this year and did so in this little poll.
why? because anything that pisses conservatives off and reinforces their feelings of white marginalization is a source of great entertainment and joy for me.
"If your children ever find out how lame you really are, they'll murder you in your sleep." Frank Zappa (1965)

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Offline MÇA

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Corzine, Christie neck and neck in NJ governor's race: poll
« Reply #16 on: 10-06-2009, 08:22am »
Corzine, Christie neck and neck in NJ governor's race: poll
By The Associated Press
October 06, 2009, 7:15AM

A new poll finds the top two candidates for New Jersey governor running nearly even. The Fairleigh Dickinson University-PublicMind Poll out today has Gov. Jon Corzine at 44 percent and Republican challenger Chris Christie at 43 percent. The difference is within the poll's margin of error. A September poll had Christie ahead, 47-42 percent.

The new poll finds 54 percent have an unfavorable view of Corzine, the same as last month. Forty-two percent now have an unfavorable opinion of Christie, up from 35 percent in September. Four percent volunteered that they support independent Chris Daggett. But Daggett's support climbs to 17 percent when his name is read with the other two.

The poll of 667 likely voters was conducted Sept. 28-Oct. 5 and has a sampling error margin of plus or minus 4 percentage points.

Offline MÇA

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Re: NJ Gubernatorial Race
« Reply #15 on: 10-05-2009, 01:08pm »
Looks like Daggett will be making at least one more appearance in Jersey City, if you can't make it to the Embankment tomorrow.



Alternatives to Corzine, Christie
Some local residents consider independent candidates
by Ricardo Kaulessar
Reporter Staff Writer

If voters decide that the lead candidates in the New Jersey governor’s race – Democratic incumbent Gov. Jon Corzine and Republican challenger Christopher Christie – aren’t viable choices on Nov. 3, who will they look at as an alternative?

Downtown Jersey City resident Phillip Rivo had the same question. He is already showing how far he will go by hosting a meet-and-greet with independent candidate Christopher Daggett this coming Tuesday, Oct. 6, at the Embankment Restaurant in Jersey City.

Rivo, a Democratic committeeperson for Ward E District 18 and founder of Democrats for Daggett, said the reason he is pulling for Daggett is that “numerous Democrats in Hudson County are upset with Corzine and refuse to support him,” and “Christie is out of the question.”

“I am going to vote for Chris Daggett because he is socially liberal and yet is fiscally conservative,” Rivo said.

Daggett is not the only independent candidate running for office. There are 12 more individuals with a longer shot than Daggett vying for the hearts of the electorate, all hoping to move into the governor’s mansion, Drumthwacket, next year.

ABC: Anybody but Corzine and Christie
Besides Daggett, also on the ballot are Jason Cullen, Kenneth Kaplan, Joshua Leinsdorf, Alvin Lindsay Jr., David R. Meiswinkle, Greg Pason, Kostas Petris, Gary T. Steele, and Gary Stein. There are also three write-in candidates: Angela Lariscy, Eddie McOwskey, and the popular comedian Uncle Floyd.

That means there are alternatives for the 2.4 million independent voters in the state of New Jersey.

So who does voting for Daggett or another independent candidate hurt more – Christie or Corzine?

Recent polls show that independent voters lean toward voting for Christie, who holds a six to 10 point lead among that voter base when compared to Corzine. Daggett’s overall poll numbers are hovering at around 10 to 15 percent, an indication that he has gained more independent voters who have Democrat or Republican leanings as the election looms closer.

However, independents and undecided voters may be nudging closer to Corzine if polls put out by Quinnipiac University and Monmouth University last week are any indication as they show the governor cutting down Christie’s lead to four and three points respectively. And the numbers could change further as Corzine, Christie and Daggett debated on Thursday in Trenton.

A Daggett in the heart of Hudson County voters
Christopher Daggett is a former moderate Republican who once worked as deputy chief of staff for Gov. Tom Kean, a Republican. And he was the head of the state’s Department of Environmental Protection under Gov. Jim Florio, a Democrat.

Daggett also has connections to Hudson County, since he is a partner in a company that owns 25 percent of the much-talked about 900 Garfield Ave. development site in Jersey City. That is a chromium-contaminated site in the city’s Bergen-Lafayette section scheduled to be cleaned up by the property’s former owner, PPG Industries, over the next five years before the site can be developed for residential housing.

Does Jersey City, and for that matter Hudson County, have a place in Daggett’s campaign?

Daggett’s spokesperson, Tom Johnson, said there was “no grand Hudson County strategy,” and “I don’t know where we are strongest in Hudson County.”

“We are not targeting specific towns; this is a statewide campaign,” Johnson said. “We are going where we are invited.”

Daggett will be coming not just to the Embankment Restaurant on Tuesday but also to speak to the Jersey City Rotary Club on Oct. 29 at Casino-in-the-Park in Lincoln Park in Jersey City.

Why another option?
Phillip Rivo has been a registered Democrat since he turned 18. One of the reasons he takes issue with Corzine is his inability to come down hard on Democrats locally, such as those who were arrested in an FBI corruption sting on July 23.

“I am not saying Corzine is corrupt, but his silence is deafening about what has happened in Hudson County,” Rivo said.

However, Corzine did push local mayors to resign after they were arrested, including Hoboken Mayor Peter Cammarano.

Rivo also is concerned with Corzine’s perceived lack of support on issues such as charter schools, which Rivo’s children attend, and dealing with fiscal problems like the state’s pension system.

However, Christie is not the alternative for Rivo. Rivo believes the Republican is “ethically challenged” because of recent revelations about his driving record and his loan to a former subordinate while working in the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Newark, and “socially out of step” due to his stances on abortion and the environment.

Rivo also doesn’t like Christie’s affiliation with former President George W. Bush, who appointed Christie as U.S. Attorney for New Jersey in 2002.

Offline TheBadGuyWins

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Re: NJ Gubernatorial Race
« Reply #14 on: 10-05-2009, 11:46am »
Chris Dagget will be at The Embankment tomorrow, Tuesday Oct 6th, at 7pm for a meet and greet. Happy hour goes all night. Some of YOU PEOPLE should stop by and have a beer with me, I'm interested in what he has to say.

Offline fasteddie

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Re: NJ Gubernatorial Race
« Reply #13 on: 10-02-2009, 10:14pm »
But it was the little-known independent, Christopher Daggett, a former Environmental Protection Agency official, who all but stole the show, promoting a plan to cut the state’s skyrocketing property taxes by up to 25 percent
25 percent? That sounds wonderful! As much as I'd love to see it happen, it's a pipe dream. Oh and notice it says "by UP TO 25 percent". Like it says in all those store circulars "save UP TO 25%" but it always turns out to really be 5% unless you buy the $15,000 TV. And his idea of compensating for this 25% by upping sales taxes and eliminating UEZ's is regressive, not to mention injurious to NJ based retailers. I always make it a point to shop in a UEZ for the few $ I will save in sales tax. No, I think Daggett has a problem with  reality. He seems like a nice man and he likes the environment and the animals but, nah. Christie? Christie strikes me as an evil fat man. I don't like his looks. If he was a jolly fat man, I might think twice before not voting for him but being an evil fat man, he gets no consideration from me.

Offline TheFang

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Re: NJ Gubernatorial Race
« Reply #12 on: 10-02-2009, 10:22am »
In New Jersey, a Sharp, Scrappy Debate

By DAVID M. HALBFINGER
Published: October 1, 2009

The rivals in the New Jersey governor’s race met Thursday night in a rambunctious first of three debates, with the Republican Christopher J. Christie assailing Gov. Jon S. Corzine over what he called “suffocating” taxes and job losses, and the Democratic incumbent dismissing Mr. Christie’s fiscal ideas as “fantasy” and his criticisms as dishonest.

But it was the little-known independent, Christopher Daggett, a former Environmental Protection Agency official, who all but stole the show, promoting a plan to cut the state’s skyrocketing property taxes by up to 25 percent and haranguing Mr. Christie in particular for lacking a specific plan of his own.

Over 90 tense minutes, Mr. Daggett, 59, seemed to metamorphose from a halting speaker in the early going into a sure-footed vaudevillian, puncturing the arguments of his opponents even as they both seemed to go out of their way to agree with him as often as possible. “It sounds like both these two guys might vote for me,” he said.

Mr. Christie, the former United States attorney for New Jersey, has seen his lead over the embattled governor dwindle to just a few percentage points in the polls, after a four-month barrage of attack ads by Mr. Corzine that Mr. Christie called “shameful.” But he focused almost exclusively on Mr. Corzine’s record, repeatedly ripping into the governor, a former Goldman Sachs chairman, calling him out of touch with the realities on the ground for ordinary residents.

When Mr. Corzine boasted of cutting some taxes in his first term, Mr. Christie pounced. “There are $9 billion in new taxes and fees since Jon Corzine became governor,” he said. “This is the Corzine squeeze: salaries going down, taxes going up. If he really sent out $7 billion in property tax relief, we should send some investigators out to find it.”

But Mr. Corzine, an uneasy debater on his best nights, nonetheless left no attack unanswered. “When Mr. Christie doesn’t like the truth, he makes up his own version,” he said, saying that census data showed a rise in median income in 2008 and that he had restored property tax rebates for many people.

The two men clashed briefly but fiercely over ethics and political corruption, which was Mr. Christie’s cause célèbre as a prosecutor and has been much in the news this year in New Jersey. Mr. Corzine, echoing his own commercials, alluded to damaging reports about Mr. Christie’s awarding of no-bid contracts, failing to report a loan to a former subordinate, and using his position to get out of traffic tickets. He accused Mr. Christie of having “one set of rules for himself” and another for everyone else.

But Mr. Christie noted that one of his investigative targets, the former Bergen County Democratic chairman, Joseph Ferriero, had just gone on trial, and that Mr. Corzine had given Mr. Ferriero more than $500,000 in political contributions over the years. “Is that the kind of example we’re talking about setting — enabling corruption with your own personal money?” he said.

The debate, at the Trenton studios of the New Jersey Network, had its share of odd moments. Mr. Corzine refused to take a no-tax pledge, citing his “constitutional responsibility to balance the budget,” as if it left him no other choice, though he called tax increases a “last resort.”

To which Mr. Christie replied, “If Jon Corzine says it’s a last resort, it’s a resort he’ll be checking into.”

Mr. Corzine doubled over in laughter, though at precisely what was not clear.

Later, all three candidates agreed that they would sign legislation allowing the medical use of marijuana — although Mr. Christie, who spoke last, seemed to come to his law-and-order candidate’s senses by insisting that he would sign a pending bill only if its “safeguards” were strengthened somehow.

“We don’t want people who have a headache to be able to go and get marijuana,” he said. “We want to make sure we don’t turn into California.”

Still, it was the unassuming Mr. Daggett who had the most to gain from the night, and seemed to make much of the opportunity.

He is the third independent candidate in New Jersey history to raise enough money to qualify for state matching funds and the second to earn a spot in the debates. But he has gone largely uncovered by the news media until this week, when he proposed extending the sales tax to services and rental homes, in exchange for a 25 percent property tax cut and cuts in corporate and some income taxes.

His statewide exposure Thursday night was not all warm and fuzzy. Asked how he would refinance the nearly broke trust fund for transportation improvements, he said it would require raising gas taxes or tolls. Mr. Christie called this a nonstarter.

But Mr. Daggett, in one of several barbs aimed at Mr. Christie, shot back: “It’s easy to criticize when you have no plan of your own. The tooth fairy’s not going to solve this problem.”
"I can't help it, I'm a greedy slob. It's my hobby." -- D.D.

Offline MÇA

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Jersey City reformers look to Daggett
« Reply #11 on: 09-28-2009, 10:26am »
Jersey City reformers look to Daggett
By MATT FRIEDMAN, PolitickerNJ.com Reporter

Independent gubernatorial candidate Christopher Daggett will make a foray into what is supposed to be Governor Corzine’s base next month.

Daggett plans to meet with some reform-minded Jersey City residents – mostly Democrats – who are upset with Corzine because they think he’s treated Mayor Jerramiah Healy with kid gloves.

“We’re just very disappointed in the Hudson County Democratic Party and the State Democratic Party,” said the meeting’s organizer, Phil Rivo. 

Rivo, a realtor and Democratic county committeeman who is a frequent antagonistic presence at council meetings, said “in simple terms, I think Corzine needs to be fired.” 

The meeting is planned for Tuesday, October 6 at The Embankment Restaurant in the downtown Hamilton Park neighborhood. 

Rivo and a small band of like-minded reformers are upset that Corzine signed an executive order reviewing development projects in Ridgefield – a town of 10,000 where the mayor has been arrested on corruption charges – but ignored Jersey City, where City Council President Mariano Vega is charged with taking bribes and other officials have admitted funneling bribe money into Healy’s reelection campaign (Healy has not been charged with a crime).

“Although [Healy] hasn’t been charged with anything, crap floats to the top,” said Rivo.

Rivo said he could not bring himself to vote for Christie either because of his conservative positions.

“Let’s vote our conscience, and my conscience is that Corzine does not deserve to have the job. Christie is out of the question, and this year we have a choice,” he said.

Offline MÇA

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Gov candidates campaign in city
« Reply #10 on: 09-01-2009, 08:47am »
Gov candidates campaign in city
Tuesday, September 01, 2009

Both Gov. Jon Corzine and his Republican challenger Chris Christie made campaign stops in Jersey City yesterday.

At a rally for nursing home workers in Journal Square, Corzine, a Democrat, picked up the endorsement of the Service Employees International Union, which has 45,000 members in New Jersey.

Milly Silva, executive vice president for the New Jersey region of SEIU1199, characterized Corzine as a "true leader and advocate for New Jersey's working families."

Meanwhile, Christie and his running mate, Monmouth County Sheriff Kim Guadagno, paid a visit to the Learning Community Charter School on Kennedy Boulevard, one of the state's most successful charter schools. They toured the school's new building and discussed their ideas for urban education.

Corzine agreed yesterday to take part in two gubernatorial debates even though he is not required to do so because he is not accepting public money for his campaign.

Christie and independent Chris Daggett must participate because their campaigns are being publicly financed.

The election is Nov. 3.

MICHAELANGELO CONTE

Offline fasteddie

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Re: NJ Gubernatorial Race
« Reply #9 on: 08-27-2009, 12:18am »
EXACTLY! It's the taxes stupid! Who gives a shit about corruption? Lower my taxes and you can turn Drumthwacket into a whorehouse for all I care, just get outta my fukin pockets.

Offline bdlaw

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Re: NJ Gubernatorial Race
« Reply #8 on: 08-26-2009, 11:26pm »
N.J. property taxes largely being ignored in governor's race

by John Reitmeyer/Statehouse Bureau
Wednesday August 26, 2009, 9:00 PM

TRENTON -- New Jersey property taxes are at an all-time high and are by far the top concern for voters right now, but the issue is largely being ignored by the leading candidates in this year's governor's race.

Instead, Gov. Jon Corzine and Republican challenger Chris Christie are spending most of their time and advertising dollars attacking each other over corruption and ethics issues -- all while average property tax bills soared over $7,000 statewide and climbed to more than $9,000 in many communities. Voters, however, aren't seriously considering corruption or ethics as issues that will determine their choice for governor, according to recent polls.

People are worried about property taxes, and their worries are at an all-time high, said Patrick Murray, director of Monmouth University's polling institute.

"This is the issue that is burning in New Jerseyans' minds," said Murray, who earlier this year found property taxes registering higher as an issue than in 2005, when Corzine and Republican Doug Forrester made lowering property taxes a cornerstone of their campaigns.

And this year the tax issue is still dominating the New Jersey gubernatorial contest despite the much-publicized federal corruption arrests announced in late July, according to a poll conducted this month by Quinnipiac University.
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More than 30 percent of those surveyed identified taxes -- and specifically property taxes -- as the most important issue, drawing 10 percent more than the next highest category in the survey, which was the economy.

Corruption drew only a 6 percent response to the "single most important issue" question. Ethics followed at 5 percent.

Yet the Corzine and Christie campaigns continue to largely gloss over property taxes, an issue that drew much more attention in past gubernatorial elections even when voters' interest in it wasn't as high as it is now.

Corzine and Forrester engaged in a heated debate throughout the summer of 2005 over who had the better plan to reduce property tax bills that, at the time, were averaging $6,022 statewide.

Forrester proposed a "30-in-3" plan well before Labor Day that sought to reduce property tax bills by 30 percent in three years by establishing a direct credit on all property tax bills.

Corzine, in turn, put forward the REAL plan, for "responsible, effective, accountable and lasting" relief. It called for increasing the size of tax rebates by 10 percent in each of his four years in office.

Four years earlier, when Democrat Jim McGreevey and Republican Bret Schundler were the gubernatorial candidates, television ads on property tax policy and rebate checks were airing by early August.

And former Gov. Christie Whitman and McGreevey were trading attacks on property taxes by July 1997. Back then, Murray's poll found voters were more concerned about car insurance, the economy and education.

This year, Corzine and Christie have talked a bit about property taxes on the stump, but they have yet to feature the issue in their campaign commercials.

And on the Web, the candidates are also highlighting other issues.

Christie's campaign website mentions property taxes in a section called "Cutting Our Taxes." There are three sentences on property tax relief, including a pledge to preserve property tax rebates that Corzine had to scale back this year in response to the economic troubles.

Christie's campaign did not provide any additional details when asked this week for more information about his plans to address property taxes.

On Corzine's campaign site, the "Providing Real Property Tax Relief and Reform" section highlights the governor's work on the issue over the last four years and touts the nearly 4 percent increase in statewide average property tax bills from 2007 to 2008 as "the lowest increase in nearly a decade."

"The governor's reforms, including an overhaul of the school funding formula, increased state investment in K-12 education, and a strictly enforced property tax levy cap will continue to work to lower property tax rates across the state," said Corzine campaign press secretary Lis Smith.

The avoidance of the property tax issue by the two major candidates -- independent Chris Daggett addresses property taxes on his website by taking on the state's numerous local government units -- is not by accident, Murray said.

Corzine doesn't want to focus his campaign on the property tax issue this time around because, with tax bills at an all-time high, he would be "reminding people why they don't like him," Murray said.

"Their strategy is let's keep property taxes off the table," he said.

And Christie has so far decided to make the race about other issues, including his record fighting corruption as U.S. attorney, Murray said, a strategy Corzine's campaign is starting to undermine.

"That decision could be the one that ends up sinking (Christie's) campaign," Murray said.
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Corzine Rival Failed to Report Loan on Tax Return
« Reply #7 on: 08-18-2009, 01:38pm »
Oops. There goes the whole "corruption-fighter" angle.



Corzine Rival Failed to Report Loan on Tax Return
By DAVID M. HALBFINGER
Published: August 18, 2009

Christopher J. Christie, the Republican challenging Gov. Jon S. Corzine, failed to report income from a loan he gave in 2007 to a top aide while he was New Jersey’s ranking federal prosecutor on his tax returns, Mr. Christie’s campaign staff disclosed on Tuesday.

Mr. Christie also failed to report the $46,000 loan as required under federal and state ethics rules.

The aide, Michele A. Brown, borrowed the money from Mr. Christie while he was United States attorney for New Jersey and she was his executive assistant and counsel, according to mortgage records in Morris County.

Mr. Christie’s aides said his failure to disclose the loan on ethics filings and in his tax returns was essentially an oversight but added that he would provide a fuller explanation at a campaign appearance scheduled for early Tuesday afternoon in Cherry Hill.

Ms. Brown was promoted to first assistant United States attorney after Mr. Christie resigned last December to begin his campaign for governor. (more)

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Big Donors Make End Run in New Jersey Campaign
« Reply #6 on: 08-05-2009, 10:01am »
NYT reveals the folks behind the various attack ads you've been seeing (including automated banner ads on this very site).



Big Donors Make End Run in New Jersey Campaign
By DAVID M. HALBFINGER
Published: August 3, 2009

Now it can be told: The National Rifle Association is pouring money into the effort to oust Gov. Jon S. Corzine of New Jersey. And the National Education Association is spending heavily to save his job.

New Jersey’s campaign finance system may have restricted the flow of big money into statewide elections and cut down on the abuses known as pay to play, but determined donors and fund-raisers always seem to find a loophole.

Indeed, newly available records show that big donors to the Democratic and Republican Parties — along with law firms, engineers and others who do business with the state — are sidestepping the state’s contribution limits and pay-to-play rules by giving to the parties’ governors’ associations, which turn around and spend heavily in New Jersey.

Harry Pozycki, chairman of the Citizens’ Campaign, a nonpartisan group that is an advocate of the pay-to-play rules, said on Monday that the two associations were providing “a huge back door for the evasion of contribution limits.” He added, “Following the money becomes that much more difficult.”

The dueling associations are so-called 527 groups, which allows them to accept donations of any size.

And because they support candidates for governor in many states, it can be difficult to draw links between any single donor and a given candidate. (more)

Offline TheFang

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Re: NJ Gubernatorial Race
« Reply #5 on: 06-09-2009, 01:10pm »
So, I was looking up on Christie's site to see where he stands on some of the "other" issues that matter to me and it seems once again as a typical Republican he talks about small government and still wants to regulate your life. Oh and I also love how the "pro-lifer" who apparently "believe(s) in the sanctity, dignity and inherent value of all human life." is for the death penalty.

-------

Questions for Chris

Are you pro-choice or pro-life?

I believe in the sanctity, dignity and inherent value of all human life. Hearing the heartbeat of my unborn daughter 14 years ago had a profound effect on me. I am pro-life because I believe her life and the life of every child is precious. I strongly support protecting children and their mothers from abortion with three exceptions: rape, incest and to protect the life of the mother. And to immediately reduce abortions in NJ, as Governor, I will push to enact a parental notification law and a 24 hour waiting period.

Where do you stand on the state’s Council on Affordable Housing, better known as COAH?

COAH is one of the biggest Trenton power grabs we have ever seen. This plan to build, by Trenton mandate and quota, 115,000 units of affordable housing in every town in NJ is bad for our environment, bad for economic growth and bad for our property taxes. The Governor’s plan, which could lead to the building of over 500,000 units of affordable and market rate housing in the next 10 years, will require that housing be built on almost every last piece of open space we have in New Jersey. This is bad for our environment and bad for our quality of life. The 2.5% fee it places on all new development in NJ has halted nearly all that development in its tracks, hurting our already suffering economy. The building of all this housing by Trenton mandate will also drive our property taxes even higher when towns then need to build the new schools, new roads and new sewer systems required to support all of this new housing. When I become Governor, I will gut COAH.

Where do you stand on gay marriage?

I believe that marriage should be exclusively between one man and one woman. I have no issue with same sex couples sharing contractual rights, but I believe that marriage should remain the exclusive domain of one man and one woman.

The issue of medical marijuana has recently come up in the State Legislature. What are your views on the legislation?

While I am very concerned that appropriate means be made available to alleviate the suffering of sick patients, I think this bill is the wrong way to do it. I do not believe that there are sufficient safeguards in this law to prevent the misuse of this drug by people who do not really need it to alleviate serious illness-related pain. As a former prosecutor, I have seen the pain that drug abuse causes, and marijuana is a gateway drug for our children to other drugs like cocaine and heroin. I would only consider a bill which had sufficient safeguards in it to prevent the widespread use of this drug by people who do not really need it.

Do you support the state’s bear hunt?

Yes.

What about the death penalty – for it or against it?

As a former federal prosecutor, I favor the death penalty, especially in cases of the murder of a law enforcement officer.
"I can't help it, I'm a greedy slob. It's my hobby." -- D.D.

Offline TheFang

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Re: Christie's pitch at hot dog stop is affordability
« Reply #4 on: 06-04-2009, 12:08pm »
Two fails in this article.

One:


The GOP nominee has been making frequent trips to Hudson County and Hoboken, hometown of Democratic incumbent Jon Corzine. Local Republicans knew that after elections Corzine liked to go to the Brownstone diner in the Paulus Hook section of the city. They said Christie would show up "where the working man" eats.


The JJ journalist doesn't know what section of town the Brownstone is in. Fail.

Two:

Quote
Before the nominee motorcaded from Journal Square he said he would return soon, but he never ate the hot dog handed to him.


Didn't eat the hotdog? Way to put down "the working man's" food. Fail.
"I can't help it, I'm a greedy slob. It's my hobby." -- D.D.

Offline MÇA

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Christie's pitch at hot dog stop is affordability
« Reply #3 on: 06-04-2009, 11:04am »
JJ:



Christie's pitch at hot dog stop is affordability
Thursday, June 04, 2009
By AGUSTIN C. TORRES
JOURNAL POLITICAL EDITOR

Yesterday, there was a larger than usual lunch-hour crowd at Boulevard Drinks, a hot dog eatery in Jersey City's Journal Square that over time has reached icon status.

People were taking cell phone pictures of former U.S. Attorney Christopher Christie, who made Journal Square one of his stops on the day after winning the Republican Party's nomination for governor.

The GOP nominee has been making frequent trips to Hudson County and Hoboken, hometown of Democratic incumbent Jon Corzine. Local Republicans knew that after elections Corzine liked to go to the Brownstone diner in the Paulus Hook section of the city. They said Christie would show up "where the working man" eats.

Just before Christie's noon arrival, there was a Jersey City Incinerator Authority truck blocking the curb in front of Boulevard Drinks, but it was not a Democratic plot, just two hot dog-loving workers who got to say hello to the ex-federal prosecutor.

The nominee acknowledged that many consider this the kickoff of the real election campaign.

"The main thing is to make New Jersey affordable again," Christie said.

Resident and businessman Bruce Alston was part of the crowd and asked a rhetorical question.

"If the election were held today, who would be governor? - Christie," he said. "What is going to change between now and November?"

Before the nominee motorcaded from Journal Square he said he would return soon, but he never ate the hot dog handed to him.

Offline bdlaw

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Re: NJ Gubernatorial Race
« Reply #2 on: 06-03-2009, 10:25am »
Lose - Lose.
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Offline TheFang

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NJ Gubernatorial Race
« Reply #1 on: 06-03-2009, 10:15am »
Well, the results are in and we now have candidates. Let's here what you got to say.

--------------

Ex-Prosecutor Wins G.O.P. Primary in New Jersey

By DAVID M. HALBFINGER

Christopher J. Christie, a former prosecutor who sent a parade of corrupt New Jersey politicians to prison, handily won the Republican nomination for governor on Tuesday, earning the right to try to dislodge the state’s embattled Democratic incumbent, Jon S. Corzine.

His romp past Steven M. Lonegan, a feisty former mayor, sets the stage for what could be a fierce and expensive confrontation with the wealthy Mr. Corzine, who came to office vowing to rescue the state from financial crisis but has watched his popularity sink to record lows as the recession made matters worse.

“I think he’s a good man, and I think he’s well-intentioned,” Mr. Christie said of Mr. Corzine. “But he is simply wrong for this job.”

The fall campaign, one of only two for governor this year (the other is in Virginia), promises to be treated to varying degrees as a referendum on President Obama’s momentous first year or on Republicans’ continued viability — in New Jersey, if not nationally. The last Republican to win statewide was Christie Whitman in 1997.

The White House left no doubt about its intention to support Mr. Corzine’s bid for a second term. In a rousing speech on Tuesday night at Mr. Corzine’s kickoff rally in West Orange, after his victory in a lopsided four-candidate Democratic primary, Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. said the governor was “on the right side of the issues” and declared: “Barack Obama and Joe Biden are committed to Jon Corzine’s reelection. Period. End of sentence. It’s simple.”

At bottom, the general election will confront New Jersey voters with a stark choice. Mr. Christie, a self-styled conservative, brings little economic experience but bold promises to rein in spending and cut taxes.

Mr. Corzine, an unapologetic liberal who has been hemmed in by budget deficits, assures New Jerseyans that his unpleasant medicine of tax increases and service cuts will prepare the state for a quicker, stronger rebound when recovery arrives.

But if re-election contests are verdicts on the incumbent, the burden on Mr. Corzine, even if he cannot regain the voters’ confidence, will be to paint Mr. Christie, who starts the campaign with a small lead in the polls, as an unacceptable alternative. And right out of the blocks Tuesday night, Mr. Corzine blasted Mr. Christie, without naming him, for his close ties to President George W. Bush.

“Our opponents promise the moon,” Mr. Corzine said in a stemwinder delivered to about 1,500 supporters before Mr. Christie’s final victory margin had become clear. “They want to cut government, increase spending, slash taxes and balance the budget. They’ve got this so-called secret plan. They won’t tell you whose taxes they’re going to cut — they’re going to check with George Bush about that. They say they’ll lay off at least 10,000 employees, maybe more — but they won’t say who, or when, or at what consequence.”

Mr. Corzine said Republicans “just say we should trust them. But I don’t know about you, but I’m not about to put my trust in the same people who gave us George Bush, Dick Cheney or John Ashcroft, skyrocketing unemployment, a housing crisis, bank bailouts, and a war in Iraq!”

Mr. Christie, meanwhile, set out to introduce himself to New Jersey’s broad political middle, where there are nearly as many unaffiliated voters as Democrats and Republicans combined, as a forceful leader equal to the task of taming a state government that has grown too big for taxpayers to afford.

In a colorful speech to several hundred rowdy supporters in Parsippany, Mr. Christie said he had “lived a Jersey life” and wanted to make the state affordable again to working families, retirees and businesses, who he said had been driven “across our borders to Delaware, Pennsylvania — and even New York.”

“That is unacceptable,” he said.

He said Mr. Corzine was animated by a desire to “create the government of his dreams,” but had “overpromised and underdelivered,” adding: “I know you don’t want government to hold your hand; you just want them to get out of your wallet.”

And he vowed to “listen more and lecture less” as governor and to restore people’s “hope, faith and trust” in government. “It’s what I did as United States attorney," Mr. Christie said, "and you can bet it’s what I’ll do as governor.”

With 97 percent of precincts reporting, Mr. Christie led Mr. Lonegan 55 percent to 42 percent. Assemblyman Rick Merkt drew 3 percent, according to The Associated Press.

Mr. Lonegan, who served 12 years as mayor of tiny Bogota, in Bergen County, before making the first of five failed bids for higher office, conceded just after 10 p.m., apologizing to about 150 supporters in East Brunswick for falling short but vowing to help defeat Mr. Corzine. He said conservatives had made their presence in the party felt. “We are here to stay,” he said. “You are here to stay.”

Mr. Christie mainly avoided being pinned down in the primary, resisting calls to issue an economic plan, or to detail what agencies or programs he would cut. But he did take plainly conservative positions on school vouchers, restrictions on abortion rights, and rolling back regulation, particularly on the environment.

At his rally, Mr. Corzine made clear he would go after Mr. Christie on social issues as well as pocketbook ones, saying Republicans indeed wanted smaller government — “small enough to slip under your bedroom door” or to “dictate their own religious beliefs to the rest of us.”

Kenny Porpora, Nate Schweber and Erik White contributed reporting.
"I can't help it, I'm a greedy slob. It's my hobby." -- D.D.

Jersey City, NJ Community Forums

NJ Gubernatorial Race
« Reply #1 on: 06-03-2009, 10:15am »