Author Topic: Montgomery Gardens slated to be transformed into low-density complex  (Read 7001 times)

Offline HippyWitch

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Re: Montgomery Gardens demolition thread [pics / video]
« Reply #12 on: 08-30-2015, 05:10pm »
These are awesome pics dude, thank you so much for sharing. How long you all think that's going to sit there? 2 years?

Offline devb

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Re: Montgomery Gardens demolition thread [pics / video]
« Reply #11 on: 08-30-2015, 04:32pm »
They left quite a mess behind. No word on cleanup will begin.

Dust everywhere






Pancake effect




Dust everywhere


Dust everywhere
« Last Edit: 08-30-2015, 04:39pm by devb »

Offline devb

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Montgomery Gardens demolition thread [pics / video]
« Reply #10 on: 08-30-2015, 04:32pm »
Days before demolition, along Cornelison:



Video released by the mayor can be seen here:

https://twitter.com/StevenFulop/status/637619113154736128

Offline moelissa

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 :rofl:


Valerie Benthall, 45, one of the residents still at the complex, is angry about having to leave her "


I read this as Valerie Bertinelli at first and thought damn,no Van Halen money, TV Land must pay shit. And then realized Bertinelli is about 107 now, not 45. Eyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy
[/quote]
[08:02PM] MacabreJS: I HAVE COOTIES

Offline HippyWitch

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Valerie Benthall, 45, one of the residents still at the complex, is angry about having to leave her "
[/quote]


I read this as Valerie Bertinelli at first and thought damn,no Van Halen money, TV Land must pay shit. And then realized Bertinelli is about 107 now, not 45. Eyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy

Offline shahaggy

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she probably has a 3 bedroom to herself and doesn't want to give it up because it's so dirt cheap.

Is being the 3rd generation of your family to live in the projects something to be proud of?
[04:53 PM] Soshin: I don't think I've ever had fig spread Darna but I like figs and they make my sphincter sing power ballads

[12:48 PM] Bobblehead: Yo, you know I'm really happy for you and Ima let you finish, but soshin had one of the best meercat shouts of all time

[10:23 PM] skwirrlking: you submitting darna for beards eating cupcakes - mca?

[03:24 PM] Darna: [03:22 PM] jeht'aimeu: skw, you are climbing up my pole as well... 

[02:28 PM] propscene: I DPON"T MEAN I LOVE YOU DEEP INSIDE AS MUCH AS I LOVE HIM DEEP INSIDE OH GOD

[12:58 PM] nikki: i feel like i should like the opposite of whatever jehu says

Offline moelissa

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Is being the 3rd generation of your family to live in the projects something to be proud of?
[08:02PM] MacabreJS: I HAVE COOTIES

Offline MÇA

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Jersey City's Montgomery Gardens complex being emptied out so area can be transformed
By Michaelangelo Conte/The Jersey Journal
on July 23, 2013 at 8:40 AM, updated July 23, 2013 at 8:41 AM

The Montgomery Gardens public housing complex, in the heart of Jersey City, not too very long ago housed 1,200 tenants.

It’s now a virtual ghost town.

There are only about 130 tenants currently residing in 80 apartments at the sprawling six-building, 434-unit complex on Montgomery Street, just down the road from the Beacon condo development, the lavishly renovated old Jersey City Medical Center.

The emptying out of Montgomery Gardens, the scene of a recent spate of shootings, is part of the Jersey City Housing Authority’s elaborate plan to do away with poor people high-rises and replace them with mixed-income housing with schools, retail shops, a grocery store, and other amenities.

"It is obsolete," Housing Authority Executive Director Maria Maio said of the complex, which was built in 1957 with federal funds. "We don’t have enough money to maintain properties like Montgomery Gardens, and we think mixed-income developments has proven to be the best way to develop affordable housing."

Over the past couple of years, three buildings in the complex have been emptied. The grounds are overgrown with weeds, strewn with trash. The spray park fountains are dry. One resident said he ran a hose out his window to cool down children still living at the complex during the recent heat wave.

The residents who have left have all been either relocated to another public housing development or have been given a Section 8 voucher to help pay rent, Maio said. So far, the moves have been voluntary, but at some point they could become mandatory, she said.

Valerie Benthall, 45, one of the residents still at the complex, is angry about having to leave her home.

"I don’t want to leave, I’ve been here since 1970," Benthall said yesterday, adding she is the third generation of her family to live at the development. "They don’t even clean up. They don’t even put on the water for the kids to play, they just want us to get out. We want to stay."

Maio said she wasn’t aware of the weeds, and trash, and non-functioning spray park. But "maybe the (spray) system just doesn’t work any more," she said. "If you have children, it may not be the best place to be."


Montgomery Gardens is hardly the first public housing development in Jersey City to go down this path. The Curries Woods, A. Harry Moore and Lafayette Gardens housing developments have all been transformed into low-density communities.

Nationally, the old public housing model — tall buildings with high concentrations of people at or near poverty — is seen as a failure, breeding grounds for crime and despair. The current thinking is that mixed-income communities will bring better services, safer communities, and pride.

"Unfortunately, A. Harry Moore was notorious for crime (and) drug activity," said Maio. The conversion to townhouses "worked out great. It certainly has made a difference to the neighborhood and lives of residents there."

The goal is to replace the 434 units at Montgomery Gardens with three- and four-story townhouses containing about 250 units, and then build another 600 units on nearby lots. Half the new units can be market-rate housing.

The project hinges on the Jersey City Housing Authority receiving a $30 million federal grant, which Maio says would be leveraged to raise more than $300 million from the New Jersey Economic Development Authority and other sources.

Grant winners will be announced in March. If the funding comes through, the time frame for completing the project would be roughly five years, Maio said.

A meeting is being held at 7 o’clock tonight at the Saint Peter’s University MacMahon Student Center, Glenwood Avenue and Kennedy Boulevard, to discuss the plans with the public. A similar meeting is on tap at the same place and same time on Aug. 15.

Muhmmad Erbad, who operates a local restaurant, said yesterday about the planned changes: "It’s good. These people don’t have money. Don’t spend money. And there will be less crime."

Offline MÇA

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Jersey City Housing Authority seeks federal grant to redevelop public housing development
By Charles Hack/The Jersey Journal
on July 21, 2013 at 7:20 PM, updated July 21, 2013 at 7:22 PM

The Jersey City Housing Authority is seeking a $30 million federal grant to redevelop Montgomery Gardens and as part of that application is holding two public meetings.

The meetings will be held Tuesday, July 23, and Thursday, Aug. 15, at Saint Peter’s University MacMahon Student Center, Glenwood Avenue and Kennedy Boulevard. Both meetings will start at 7 p.m.

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development provides just three Choice Neighborhood Grants nationwide each year, and as part of the application the housing authority is required to hold meetings to keep the public informed of the application.

To qualify for the grant, the housing authority will have to replace the existing 435 public housing or Section 8 units at Montgomery Gardens on Montgomery Street and add an additional 436 new housing units.

The housing authority will also have to demonstrate to HUD that the new development will have certain amenities, including retails stores, schools, youth programs, restaurants banks and health clinics, officials said.

It will also have to improve access to pre-K school programs, parks and recreational facilities and public transportation, as well walkways for pedestrians and bikes.

Offline jcgov

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The Jersey City Housing Authority will hold two public meetings as part of its 2013 application for a $30 million U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Choice Neighborhood Grant for redevelopment of the Montgomery Gardens Housing Complex and neighborhood.

The meetings will be held at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, July 23rd and Thursday, August 15th at St. Peter’s University MacMahon Student Center, Glenwood Avenue and Kennedy Boulevard.

The public is invited to attend the meetings, learn about the grant application and process, and share feedback. HUD is making three grant awards available nationwide, and therefore the application is extremely competitive.

The Choice Neighborhood grant plan must include 435 public housing or Section 8 units to replace the former units at Montgomery Gardens and an additional 436 housing units. All of the units must be energy efficient and able to withstand “Superstorms,” handicap accessible, built on streets that are walkable or bikeable, and must provide internet service for all units.

The JCHA grant application must also show how the institution will work with a federally qualified health care center to provide easier access to affordable healthcare for residents, help teens and adults find employment, and improve the quality of local schools and academic support for youth.

Read all the requirements the grant application must also include to be considered here.

City of Jersey City
Office of Communications
http://www.jerseycitynj.gov/

Offline MÇA

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Revitalizing a Neighborhood in Jersey City
« Reply #2 on: 04-08-2011, 02:36pm »
From the NYT:



Revitalizing a Neighborhood in Jersey City
By ANTOINETTE MARTIN
Published: April 7, 2011

“THE fact that we can predict health, economic and educational outcomes of children based on their ZIP codes is a tragedy,” said Shaun Donovan, the secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Mr. Donovan made the remark last month on a visit here, in reference to the crime- and violence-plagued neighborhood around the Montgomery Gardens public housing project. He came to Jersey City to award a grant aimed at aiding transformation of the whole neighborhood and not just replacement of the Gardens, which was already scheduled to happen.

He said the $250,000 planning grant was part of the Obama administration’s new “Choice Neighborhoods” initiative, which encourages public and private institutions to work together to further all types of development — including market-rate and “work force” housing, retail and commercial space, and schools — in neighborhoods alongside subsidized housing.

There is no guarantee that communities receiving planning grants will later be awarded HUD grants to help execute their plans, but Jersey City officials say they are hopeful.

For the first time, local officials and developers said with enthusiasm, the federal program is “embracing” private developers, encouraging them to take part in the planning the grant will support.

Jersey City was one of 17 communities selected from 119 applying nationwide. Its Housing Authority, which is emptying out the six-acre Montgomery Gardens and relocating residents before demolition of the project’s deteriorated apartment towers can begin, made the application. (The master developer for the new mixed-use housing on the site is the Michaels Development Company of Marlton.)

Maria Maio, the authority’s executive director, said she and her colleagues had been “led to understand that the fact we already have the strong interest and involvement of private developers, as well as St. Peter’s College wanting to invest in improving the overall neighborhood, tipped the scales in our favor.” George Filopoulos of MetroVest in Manhattan, the developer of the Beacon condominium complex in Jersey City, described the grant as “tremendously exciting for us,” adding, “We feel like there is new fuel in the tank.”

The Beacon represents one transformation that has already taken place: renovation of the former Jersey City medical center’s Art Deco towers into upscale condos and loft apartments, right next to the Montgomery Gardens project.

But the condo complex is gated — “and we’ve done pretty much all we can do on our side of the fences,” Mr. Filopoulos said. “We are committed to improving the neighborhood at large, and raring to go, to help rebuild and restore it to health.”

MetroVest has also been named developer of a major supermarket on the Montgomery Gardens site.

Inside the Beacon’s gates, MetroVest will build one of two charter schools planned to serve the neighborhood. The school, the Mathematics, Engineering, and Technology & Science charter, plans to offer a Bronx High School of Science curriculum, approved by the Liberty Science Center. “The HUD people really homed in on the charter-school part of our plan,” Ms. Maio said.

Meanwhile, the 140-year-old St. Peter’s College is working on plans to develop two pieces of property it owns on Montgomery Street outside its campus, near what is known as Monsignor McGinley Square.

“We really want to see this area revitalized,” said Michael A. Fazio, a vice president for external affairs of St. Peter’s. He said enrollment was at a four-year high — around 3,000 — and “we need the neighborhood to be as safe and vibrant as possible.”

The college is about to break ground on campus property for a six-story student center.

It is working with a private developer, Trinity Acquisition and Development, and has met informally with city planners and community groups, including Montgomery Gardens residents, concerning proposals for an entertainment center at 711 Montgomery Street and a mixed-use building at No. 700.

St. Peter’s intends to sign a long-term lease on both parcels with a developer who would build and maintain the structures. They are now in use as parking lots.

“There is a lot of energy and optimism already built up around the idea of an entertainment center in that area,” said Jerramiah T. Healy, Jersey City’s mayor. The current plan calls for three levels of retail and entertainment space, including a movie theater, something that is lacking in the general area west of the Holland Tunnel, Mayor Healy said. The center would have a 300-car parking garage, said Eugene T. Paolino, a real estate lawyer representing Trinity Acquisition and Development, a New York company.

The area around the housing project has quick access to the New Jersey Turnpike and is not far from the Grove Street PATH station.

Mr. Paolino said the other proposed building on Montgomery would be taller, and larger in scope, with three levels of retail and parking for 600 cars, half for the college, at its base. Three 11-story towers for housing would rise above that.

The current plan, he said, is to designate one tower for student dormitories; one for moderately priced housing; and one for market-rate rentals or condos.

In the decade before the recession Jersey City saw housing construction boom. Dozens of luxurious apartment towers rose in the downtown area and on the waterfront.

“But not all neighborhoods have yet been able to share in this city’s renewal,” Mr. Donovan said on his visit last month. At Montgomery Gardens, he said, “fully a third of residents live below the poverty line, disconnected from opportunity only a few miles away.”

Offline MÇA

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Montgomery Gardens in Jersey City is slated to be transformed into low-density complex for mixed-income tenants and seniors, reflecting national trend
Thursday, August 05, 2010
By MICHAELANGELO CONTE
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

The Montgomery Gardens housing complex in Jersey City - the scene of two recent shootings - is getting chopped down to size.

As part of a nationwide push to shrink public housing developments into smaller, mixed-income communities, most of the 434-unit complex is slated to be leveled and will be replaced by a seniors building and 60 to 90 other residences, Jersey City Housing Authority Executive Director Maria Maio said yesterday.

For years now, housing authorities around the nation have been knocking down the old high-density housing projects and replacing them with smaller, mixed-income communities. A. Harry Moore, Lafayette Gardens and the Curries Woods housing developments in Jersey City have already undergone such conversions. The belief is that these communities help avoid the kind of violence that has afflicted Montgomery Gardens for several years.

The most recent incident to galvanize the public's attention was the July 16 shooting of 5-year-old Hasmera Clayton. Police say an 18-year-old Jersey City youth, who they say was shooting at someone else, shot Hasmera in the neck. The bullet nicked her spine and she is now in rehab trying to walk again.

Two days ago, a 19-year-old man was shot multiple times at the housing development and was taken to the hospital in critical condition.

Maio said yesterday the trimmed-down developments have seen significantly less crime. "There is absolutely a significant reduction in crime," said Maio. "The problem with the high-density buildings is they become public buildings so people have access to them and sometimes it's very difficult to figure out who is responsible for these activities. The crime at Montgomery is becoming very significant."

The first phase of the conversion at Montgomery Gardens will involve gutting the 12-story, 60-unit building at Florence and Montgomery streets and turning it into a seniors building, Maio said. Construction should start next summer and take about 18 months to complete, she said.

It's likely the residences to replace the Montgomery Gardens high-rises will be built by private developers on nearby vacant lots in the area of Cornelison and Fairmount avenues, Maio said. Land there is owned by Metrovest, which developed the nearby Beacon condominiums at the old Jersey City Medical Center, and will fit some 60 to 90 residences, she said.

Conversion of the high-rise apartment buildings is in "very preliminary stages," Maio said. Residents would have to apply to move into the new housing and the screening process will include a background check for recent criminal activity, Maio said.

Residents will have other options, including moving to other public housing, Section 8 subsidies, renting in the private market, or buying. "The hardest part of all of this is always relocation," said Maio. "Even with all the issues facing Montgomery Garden . there is still reluctance to move because it is home."

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