Author Topic: Clerical error might have cost N.J. an education grant  (Read 9464 times)

Offline MÇA

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New Jersey Misses Out On Another Federal School Grant
« Reply #25 on: 12-01-2010, 08:34am »
New Jersey Misses Out On Another Federal School Grant
November 30, 2010 6:52 PM

JERSEY CITY, N.J. (CBS 2) – After blasting the Christie administration for missing out on a $400 million “Race To The Top” federal education grant, New Jersey Democrats are now accusing the Governor of being too lax in trying to get money for charter school start-ups.

Vashti Johnson and Al Garas are waiting to find out if New Jersey will approve their application to open up a new charter school catering to autistic children in Jersey City. Both, however, are upset the state has been denied a $14 million federal grant to help schools just starting up. “Look at the numbers of children that will be suffering as a result of not having that start-up capital,” Johnson told CBS 2′s Christine Sloan.

Democrats are blaming Christie’s administration for missing out on the money by saying it didn’t have a good plan to measure current charter schools in the application. “Because they’re responsible for putting the application in and if the application is denied, something went wrong with the process,” Assemblyman and Education Committee member Ralph Caputo said.

A spokesperson for the Department of Education blamed the loss on past administrations. “The Department of Education has taken action to improve its charter school operation and fundamentally change a culture and organization that during prior administrations was regarded as hostile towards charter school expansion,” the spokesman said in a statement.

Seven charter schools have been approved to open next year, including The Dream Preparatory Academy in Jersey City. Each school would have gotten a $150,000 under the grant.

Those who run the successful Elysian Charter School in Hoboken said the money is important. Kathy Mone went through the process with a Jersey City start-up. “In the first year, we needed the start-up grant money for the security deposit on the building,” Mone said.

Sloan reported the state will apply for the federal grant money again.

Offline fasteddie

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Re: Clerical error might have cost N.J. an education grant
« Reply #24 on: 09-08-2010, 08:23am »
Meanwhile, Lord Crispie was busy gettin down with the unwashed masses and the real issues on the gritty streets of NJ....

"Starting a fall push, Gov. Chris Christie today said it's time to get to work on a series of new ethics laws and changes to pension and health benefits, the education system and the state's business climate.

At a town hall meeting at the Packanack Lake Country Club, the Republican governor set a deadline for the Democrat-controlled legislature to pass the proposals: Christmas.

"We can't wait any longer for these reforms to be done," Christie told a mostly friendly crowd of about 250 in a Republican bastion......"


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Online jehu

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Re: Clerical error might have cost N.J. an education grant
« Reply #22 on: 09-06-2010, 04:04pm »
Schundler is now looking to take unemployment?!

TheFang: yeah, i gotta agree with jehu here

Darna: we had a lovely shat with mrs binky this morning

stephen: Hmm… I'm as clueless as you are.

Darna: could someone please splain to me why a person in a gang is called a gangbanger but a gangbang has nothing to do with gang activity?

shahaggy: can't believe I'm saying this but +1 jehu

[02:58 PM] MCA: it's not stalking, it's caring enough to find out things she won't tell you herself

[01:35 PM] shahaggy: fine but jehu's correct

TheFang: as much as it pains me to say, jehu might be right.

One time, I hired a monkey to take notes for me in class. I would just sit back with my mind completely blank while the monkey scribbled on little pieces of paper. At the end of the week, the teacher said, "Class, I want you to write a pape

Offline MÇA

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N.J. Democrats push ahead with hearing to 'dissect' Race to the Top error
Published: Saturday, September 04, 2010, 7:44 AM
Updated: Saturday, September 04, 2010, 11:41 AM
Statehouse Bureau Staff

TRENTON — Assembly Democrats have called upon nearly everyone in the state who might have laid a hand on the failed Race to the Top application — from the governor’s chief of staff down to the person who hand-delivered it to Washington, D.C. — to testify at a hearing Tuesday.

The hearing is an attempt to "dissect" an error that cost the state $400 million in federal education funding and "avoid future missteps," according to a press release the Democrats issued late Friday. That session, as well as one planned by Senate Democrats, will prolong an issue Gov. Chris Christie had declared over.

Former education commissioner Bret Schundler, who said he made the error while editing the state’s application, was invited to testify but Friday night said in an e-mail to The Star-Ledger he has not decided whether he will appear.

Several Christie administration officials from the Department of Education will attend, including acting Commissioner Rochelle Hendricks, according to a letter the administration sent Friday to Assemblywoman Nellie Pou (D-Passaic), chairwoman of the committee holding the hearing.

But four top Christie aides, including chief of staff Rich Bagger, will not appear because they were not involved in preparing or submitting the application, the letter said.

Democrats said they want to know why a consultant the state hired did not catch the error. Representatives from the firm, Wireless Generation, which was paid more than $500,000 through the Race to the Top process over the past year, also were asked to attend. The state lost nearly 5 points for giving the wrong answer to one question in the more than 1,000-page application — and then lost the competition by 3 points.

[...]

Assemblyman John DiMaio (R-Warren) called the hearing a "gross waste of time." "We’re not going to change anything now by having hearings," he said. "This is nothing more than simply grandstanding."

Pou (D-Passaic) said in a statement the administration had not provided requested documents "in a timely manner." The Christie administration has not responded to several Star-Ledger requests for documents, including a request for a draft that proves Schundler made the error.

The hearing before the Assembly Appropriations Committee is scheduled for 10 a.m.

By Lisa Fleisher and Matt Friedman/Statehouse Bureau Staff

Offline TheFang

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Re: Clerical error might have cost N.J. an education grant
« Reply #20 on: 09-03-2010, 03:47pm »
Chris Christie picked the wrong guy to call a liar

BY STEVE KORNACKI

You can certainly understand why Chris Christie threw his education commissioner, Bret Schundler, under the bus last week. After all, it was Schundler's department that botched the state's "Race to the Top" application, costing New Jersey five points on its application -- the difference between $400 million in federal money and nothing.

But Christie, the state's first-year governor, didn't just fire Schundler for incompetence: He called him a liar. Loudly and repeatedly. He felt this necessary because when the news of the botched application first broke last Wednesday, Christie publicly blamed the Obama administration, claiming that Schundler had supplied the data that was missing from the application -- budget numbers for the years 2008 and 2009 -- in advance of his formal hearing with the federal Department of Education. The real blame, Christie insisted, was with Obama's army of inflexible bureaucrats.

"That’s the stuff the Obama administration should answer for," he thundered. "Are you guys just down there checking boxes like mindless drones, or are you thinking? When the president comes back to New Jersey, he’s going to have to explain to the people of the state of New Jersey why he’s depriving them of $400 million that this application earned."

This argument quickly unraveled when a videotape of Schundler's hearing was released, showing that the education commissioner and his team were blindsided by the error and unable to provide the missing data. When that tape emerged, Christie changed gears, branded Schundler a liar and fired him.

"Don't lie to the governor. That's the message," he declared.

But there's a problem with that version, too: Schundler didn't lie to Christie, and now he's going public with e-mails that prove it. The e-mails, between Schundler and Christie's communications director, show that Schundler was upfront with the governor's team about his failure to provide the feds with the correct data. And in a separate personal account of last week's events released with the e-mails, Schundler describes a phone conversation with Christie on the morning that Christie blasted the Obama administration:

The Governor said he was angry about the missing information in our grant application, but that no one was going to lose their job over it. He said he was about to do a press conference about the matter, and that he believed it is always better to be on offense than defense, so he would accept responsibility for the error, and then go on offense against the Obama Administration. He was going to try to make the story about their picayune rules. He was going to say that I gave the reviewers the missing information, but the Obama Administration refused to give us the points we deserved, and that this showed they put bureaucratic rules above meaningful education reform.

It's pretty obvious what happened here. Christie, in his first seven months in office, has racked up plenty of favorable press coverage with his blunt, plain-spoken style. He's crafted a powerful image as a common-sense governor at war with the bureaucrats and special interests that have ruined his state.

But there's no room in this narrative for clerical mistakes that cost the state $400 million. So from the minute the story broke, the search was on for a scapegoat -- and the Obama administration made for a perfect target. And it might have worked, too, had Schundler's hearing with the feds not been videotaped. If that had been the case, then it would have been Christie's word against Obama's, a winning bet right now for the governor. But it was taped -- something Christie didn't realize. As Schundler himself puts it now:

I have thought about the possibility that beyond my being a scapegoat for his misstatement, the Governor might be angry at me for not telling him the interview was videotaped. In my defense, I never believed I needed to say, “Governor, stick to the truth, there’s a videotape.” Perhaps I should have.

 

Steve Kornacki is Salon's news editor. Reach him by email at SKornacki@salon.com and follow him on Twitter @SteveKornacki More Steve Kornacki
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Offline CeeDub

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Re: Clerical error might have cost N.J. an education grant
« Reply #19 on: 09-02-2010, 08:49am »
Cheese'n'rice, Bret, you should know this:

"Be careful if you go for a ride with the Devil, because at some point in the trip, he's going to want to drive . . . "

Offline MÇA

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Ex-N.J. education chief Schundler releases chronology, says Christie 'defamed' him
Published: Thursday, September 02, 2010, 7:08 AM
Star-Ledger Staff

TRENTON — Fired Education Commissioner Bret Schundler said Wednesday he is not a liar and took a shot at Gov. Chris Christie, who he said "defamed" him "for something he knows I did not do." "Good prosecutors don’t support their argument with claims they know are false," Schundler said, referring to the governor’s former job as U.S. Attorney for New Jersey. "And they don’t charge people that they know are innocent."

The former commissioner’s strident defense came in a seven-page chronology released a day after he took responsibility for an error that cost the state up to $400 million in federal education funds. The Christie administration said Schundler’s handwritten notes deleted crucial 2008-09 information from a page of the state’s Race to the Top application.

Christie has said Schundler told him the budget information was given to federal reviewers, and the governor made that statement at a news conference. Schundler said he never told the governor he provided that data. After a tumultuous week of revelations and repercussions, Christie’s spokesman Wednesday said the governor stands by his version of what happened.

"Once again, Mr. Schundler acknowledges that he told both the governor and the U.S. Secretary of Education that he verbally confirmed for Race to the Top judges that New Jersey satisfied spending criteria on education for the period 2008-2009," spokesman Michael Drewniak said. "However, video of the presentation revealed that this was not the case. This indisputable fact was the basis for Mr. Schundler’s dismissal, no matter how much he attempts to cloud the issue or redirect responsibility for his own conduct."

Documents provided by Bret Schundler:
• Termination chronology of events
• Comella e-mail exchange
• First Bagger rewrite of Duncan letter
• My draft letter to Secretary Duncan

Christie fired Schundler Friday, saying the education commissioner misrepresented what happened during the state’s Race to the Top presentation in Washington, D.C., last month. Christie has not directly called Schundler a liar, but on Tuesday he said there is one clear lesson from last week’s fiasco: "Don’t lie to the governor. That’s the message."

"The governor’s charge against me is false," Schundler said Wednesday in his document, which at times was indignant. The chronology was accompanied by e-mail exchanges and letters Schundler said support his contention that the governor misinterpreted what he was told. "The governor called me a liar this week," Schundler said. "That was the last straw. I have no choice now but to defend my name through this chronology of facts and the attached evidence."

[...]

Schundler denies the governor’s version of events. "I interrupted and told him not to claim that I had provided the missing numbers to our grant reviewers," Schundler said. "I stressed that I did NOT provide the missing information; I did not have it."

In his chronology, Schundler said he recalled telling one of the interviewers "that we did meet the education spending criterion. But that exchange is not on the videotape of the one-hour Q & A." "It’s clear to me now that it must have happened three minutes later when, the hour over, we and the reviewers stood up, shook hands, and exchanged niceties," he continued.

Not so, Drewniak said. "We’ve gone over this, and over this," he said Tuesday. "The commissioner represented to the governor that he had taken the opportunity to correct information before the panel. And as you guys (in the media) know, he subsequently offered varying explanations for when that might have occurred, including after the tape stopped rolling. So we’ll have to leave that for others to interpret."

Schundler also said that while the state, as a "first runner-up," was drafting a letter to the federal education department seeking leftover Race to the Top funds, he asked Richard Bagger, the governor’s chief of staff, not to say Schundler had given federal officials the 2008-09 data.

"I now feared I was being set up," Schundler said. "Rich probably cringed when the governor misspoke, just as I did when I read the transcript. The governor’s statement could easily become an embarrassment. I feared they were setting me up as a scapegoat."

Acting Education Commissioner Rochelle Hendricks, who took over the post after Schundler was fired, and who led her first state board of education meeting Wednesday, declined to comment on the chronology. "Not at this time," she said, leaving the meeting. "I know there might be (legislative) hearings. We will share what we know at this time."

By Jeanette Rundquist and Jessica Calefati/The Star-Ledger

Offline fasteddie

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Re: Clerical error might have cost N.J. an education grant
« Reply #17 on: 09-01-2010, 08:42am »
Gov Crispie sez "it's over, case solved, nothing to see here, move along"

N.J. Democrats push for hearing on Race to the Top error, despite Christie's call to move on
Published: Wednesday, September 01, 2010, 8:00 AM

— Gov. Chris Christie Tuesday declared an end to the controversy over the state’s failed attempt for Race to the Top funding — saying the mystery of the fatal error had been solved — and called on top Democrats to cancel hearings on the controversial issue.

Democrats resisted, saying lingering questions remain about the error and the role of a consultant hired by the state to help complete the application for up to $400 million in federal education funding.

The Christie administration did not respond to requests for documents proving the error had been made by former Education Commissioner Bret Schundler. However, Schundler, who was fired last Friday, acknowledged he "must have" made the error. He said he learned the state had a draft of the application with edits, in his handwriting, that remove budget information federal officials had requested.

At a press conference in Morris County Tuesday, Christie said Schundler’s admission should close the book on the matter.

"There’s really no enduring mysteries left in this," he said. "We now know who made the mistake, we know how he made the mistake, we know when he made the mistake. And so it’s time now to move on."

The Republican governor also brushed aside demands by Democrats to apologize to the Obama administration, saying he stands by his criticism that the application rules are too rigid. Instead, he chastised Democrats, telling them to cancel their planned hearings and address the real matters affecting the state, like property taxes.

Christie said there is one clear lesson from last week’s fiasco: "Don’t lie to the governor," he said. "That’s the message."

The governor has maintained Schundler misled him about the state’s attempt to correct an error on the Race to the Top application during a presentation last month before peer judges in Washington, D.C.

Christie has said publicly the judges would not let the state correct the error. But a video released by the U.S. Department of Education contradicted those claims and showed the state did not try to correct the mistake.

The error was committed on a five-point question. The state provided school funding data for 2011 instead of 2008 and 2009, the years requested. The mistake cost New Jersey 4.8 points on the 500-point application.

In the end, New Jersey missed out on the funding by 3 points. Nine states and the District of Columbia were awarded more than $3.3 billion in Race to the Top funds, which reward states for aggressive and new approaches to improving schools.

Schundler has said he warned Christie not to say New Jersey tried to correct the error — which would have been against the rules — and produced e-mails from conversations last Tuesday in which he told the governor’s staff he did not provide new information to the judges.

But Tuesday, Christie said Schundler’s story was "the exact opposite" on Wednesday morning. He said Schundler told him he had "updated the panel at the hearing that he complied with the requirements of the question."

"It is, I think, pretty clear at this point that the truth wasn’t told," Christie said. "As governor, all you can do with cabinet officers is ask them questions and rely upon the fact that they’re going to give you the straight answers."

Schundler declined to comment Tuesday.

Meanwhile, Assemblyman Patrick Diegnan (D-Middlesex) said a hearing was still necessary to determine why, among other things, a consultant that was paid almost $180,000 for its work on the application did not catch the mistake.

The consultant, Wireless Generation, was paid $524,250 for work on two rounds of the federal competition, state contracts show.

"Let’s disclose all the documents, all the supporting documents, anything that was handwritten or marked up," he said. "Let’s have a thorough review of them, and then we’ll be able to turn the page and move on."

Sen. Barbara Buono (D-Middlesex) said her chamber would move forward with a hearing.

"We’re not going to sweep this under the rug just because it’s politically expedient for the governor," Buono, the majority leader, said in a statement.

Staff writers Jessica Calefati and Matt Friedman contributed to this report.

Online jehu

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Re: Clerical error might have cost N.J. an education grant
« Reply #16 on: 08-31-2010, 10:30am »
180K for a consultant firm!!! I do that shiite for a lot cheaper!!!! Damn...
TheFang: yeah, i gotta agree with jehu here

Darna: we had a lovely shat with mrs binky this morning

stephen: Hmm… I'm as clueless as you are.

Darna: could someone please splain to me why a person in a gang is called a gangbanger but a gangbang has nothing to do with gang activity?

shahaggy: can't believe I'm saying this but +1 jehu

[02:58 PM] MCA: it's not stalking, it's caring enough to find out things she won't tell you herself

[01:35 PM] shahaggy: fine but jehu's correct

TheFang: as much as it pains me to say, jehu might be right.

One time, I hired a monkey to take notes for me in class. I would just sit back with my mind completely blank while the monkey scribbled on little pieces of paper. At the end of the week, the teacher said, "Class, I want you to write a pape

Offline MÇA

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Fired N.J. education chief Bret Schundler says he made 'Race to the Top' error
Published: Monday, August 30, 2010, 9:32 PM
Updated: Tuesday, August 31, 2010, 8:09 AM
Lisa Fleisher/Statehouse Bureau

TRENTON -- Former Education Commissioner Bret Schundler admitted today he made the crucial error that cost New Jersey up to $400 million federal education funds, saying he inadvertently removed crucial data from the state’s application. However, Schundler, who was fired from his post last Friday, continued to maintain he did not lie to Gov. Chris Christie when describing what happened during the state’s Race to the Top presentation to judges in Washington, D.C., earlier this month.

In a telephone interview with The Star-Ledger, Schundler said he’s learned the Education Department has found a draft of the Race to the Top application with edits, in his handwriting, that remove the data federal officials requested. Schundler told The Record one member of a team of consultants hired to help with the application found the draft. The consultant, Wireless Generation, was paid $179,750 to help develop New Jersey’s application. The contract promised the firm would be "responsible for the quality, technical accuracy and timely completion" of the proposal.

Still, Schundler blamed himself. "I was responsible," he said. "What can I say? ... I screwed up." A spokesman for the Department of Education referred calls to the governor’s press office, which declined to comment.

Andrea Reibel, spokeswoman for Wireless Generation, would not comment on the contract’s declaration that the company was responsible for the accuracy of the application. "Wireless Generation provided planning and advisory services to the New Jersey Department of Education in support of its Race to the Top application," she wrote in an e-mail to The Record. "At this point, any questions about the state’s application should be addressed to the New Jersey Department of Education."

[...]

Schundler said today he "must have" edited out the previous years’ information because he didn’t have the question in front of him — just the answer — and assumed the federal government would want current information. "That’s the thing I can’t understand. That’s so fundamental and such a big screw-up," he said. "It’s amazing to me that we screwed up in this regard. It’s amazing to me that I screwed up in this regard, and that others — that we screwed up as a team."

Schundler said a bevy of lawyers, consultants and education department employees were editing and fact-checking the application throughout the week before it was due June 1. He said he spent much of last week trying to piece together the edits before the deadline, checking through his computer files, but could not pinpoint when the error was made. (more)

Online jehu

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Re: Clerical error might have cost N.J. an education grant
« Reply #14 on: 08-29-2010, 07:13pm »
You don't know the half of it... Submitting proposals to US Dept of Ed is a nightmare, not only are their RFP's lousy at giving you proper instructions in what they are looking for in terms of project goals, but their submission system is antiquated and will not allow you to submit any thing past the deadline, including updated/missing information.... Worse is, you have to fax a copy of the coverpages with a signature AFTER you submitted the proposals online.... :palm:


As for giving it to Ohio to bolster the dems...  with 5 external reviewers (as I believe they used) it is tough to direct this type of funding at one particular applicant, not impossible, but really, really tough...  Would just be easier for the dems to earmark some money and give it to Ohio that way...



It's possible that BOTH Christie didn't want the funds, AND Washington wanted to direct it to Ohio to bolster the flagging Dem campaign in that State.

Christie can now do deeper surgury on long-term NJ public finances, Ohio dems get a financial boost. Win-win for the pols?

If you screw up numbers your federal tax return, you generally get a second chance to re-file, particularly when they owe you. County property taxes is where you're hosed, and it seems Fed education grant applications.


TheFang: yeah, i gotta agree with jehu here

Darna: we had a lovely shat with mrs binky this morning

stephen: Hmm… I'm as clueless as you are.

Darna: could someone please splain to me why a person in a gang is called a gangbanger but a gangbang has nothing to do with gang activity?

shahaggy: can't believe I'm saying this but +1 jehu

[02:58 PM] MCA: it's not stalking, it's caring enough to find out things she won't tell you herself

[01:35 PM] shahaggy: fine but jehu's correct

TheFang: as much as it pains me to say, jehu might be right.

One time, I hired a monkey to take notes for me in class. I would just sit back with my mind completely blank while the monkey scribbled on little pieces of paper. At the end of the week, the teacher said, "Class, I want you to write a pape

Offline nugnfutz

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Re: Clerical error might have cost N.J. an education grant
« Reply #13 on: 08-29-2010, 06:56pm »
It's possible that BOTH Christie didn't want the funds, AND Washington wanted to direct it to Ohio to bolster the flagging Dem campaign in that State.

Christie can now do deeper surgury on long-term NJ public finances, Ohio dems get a financial boost. Win-win for the pols?

If you screw up numbers your federal tax return, you generally get a second chance to re-file, particularly when they owe you. County property taxes is where you're hosed, and it seems Fed education grant applications.


Offline Soshin

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Re: Clerical error might have cost N.J. an education grant
« Reply #12 on: 08-28-2010, 09:24am »
Okay so far as I can see.  Chris Christie appoints Bret Schundler who initially negotiates this application with the teachers union who in turn support it. 

Christie then overrides his own education commissioner and has his staff rewrite the grant over the memorial day weekend in a way that then lost the support of the union but won support of conservatives everywhere.  Something that cost the application even more points than the clerical error did. 

He then throws Schundler under the bus and tells the world that the blame basically lies with everyone but him. 
No wonder he is on everybody's shortlist for 2012.

:2thumbs:

Oh well at least we get to see a Christie vs Grundler celebrity death match!!  :nana:
"god hates you. you will all go to yuppie hell. in yuppie hell there is no starbucks or hole foods or sushi bar. in yuppie hell you will work 16 hours a day in a bodega. in yuppie hell your car will not start when the sweeper is coming down the street. in yuppie hell your doorman will terrorize you and have sex with your wife or husband...when you are at work....in the bodega. in yuppie hell you will go to the laundromat and lose your last quarter in a broken washing machine. in yuppie hell you will buy all your food and clothing at the 99 cent store. in yuppie hell there are no cell phones, you will use a pay phone. a filthy pay phone".      -   Cat_Man Dude

Offline bdlaw

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Re: Clerical error might have cost N.J. an education grant
« Reply #11 on: 08-28-2010, 01:06am »
I know critiquing the Journal is like punching a four-year-old in the mouth, but I'm disappointed the intro to this piece passed by a human being with the word "editor" somewhere in their job description.

Quote
BY GEOFF MULVIHILL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
HADDONFIELD, N.J. -- For anyone who's ever entered the wrong number on a tax return and been denied a refund, or accidentally overtipped, here's some consolation: A silly error on New Jersey's application for the highly competitive Race to the Top education grants might have cost the state $400 million.

Irrespective of the politics and buck-passing involved (which are odious)-

If I screw up the numbers on my tax return, that's my own damn fault;

If I over-tip, that's my own damn fault too.

How is it "consoling" for the readers of this piece that this situation (which will potentially lead to yet more problems budgeting educational programs in this state) is someone else's damn fault?

In any event, I hate to come across as bitter. I'm glad that Mr. Mulvihill, with his light touch and beautiful, lilting prose, has brought us all together to laugh at this "silly error"; drawing a parallel which is akin to suggesting I shouldn't feel so bad about accidentally giving the pizza delivery guy a $15 tip instead of $5, because my negligent neighbor burned down my entire block the same night.

Has there ever been a sillier error?  Well, perhaps the award of a degree in journalism or writing of some sort to Mr. Mulvihill.
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Online jehu

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Re: Clerical error might have cost N.J. an education grant
« Reply #10 on: 08-27-2010, 10:38am »
I wonder if this was on purpose... Didn't he say earlier that he would have to look at what 'strings' were attached the federal school funding before he accepted it...

TheFang: yeah, i gotta agree with jehu here

Darna: we had a lovely shat with mrs binky this morning

stephen: Hmm… I'm as clueless as you are.

Darna: could someone please splain to me why a person in a gang is called a gangbanger but a gangbang has nothing to do with gang activity?

shahaggy: can't believe I'm saying this but +1 jehu

[02:58 PM] MCA: it's not stalking, it's caring enough to find out things she won't tell you herself

[01:35 PM] shahaggy: fine but jehu's correct

TheFang: as much as it pains me to say, jehu might be right.

One time, I hired a monkey to take notes for me in class. I would just sit back with my mind completely blank while the monkey scribbled on little pieces of paper. At the end of the week, the teacher said, "Class, I want you to write a pape

Offline fasteddie

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« Last Edit: 09-02-2010, 08:52am by MCA »

Offline TMN

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Re: Clerical error might have cost N.J. an education grant
« Reply #8 on: 08-26-2010, 09:52am »
He actually held up the one page with the error that cost us the 400 mil.  :-\
“What lies behind you and what lies in front of you, pales in comparison to what lies inside of you.”    Ralph Waldo Emerson

Offline shahaggy

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Re: Clerical error might have cost N.J. an education grant
« Reply #7 on: 08-26-2010, 09:28am »

"mid-level staffer"? "two workers"? If a private corp or university were working on a $400 million proposal, wouldn't they, at the very least, give this to a VP with an entire task group? Heads need to roll on this one, chubby. You lost MY TAX DOLLARS to Ohio! You owe me 400 MILLION DOLLARS.


that's where you're wrong, they would have had jehu on the case :palm:

  >:D  >:D  >:D  >:D  >:D
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[10:23 PM] skwirrlking: you submitting darna for beards eating cupcakes - mca?

[03:24 PM] Darna: [03:22 PM] jeht'aimeu: skw, you are climbing up my pole as well... 

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Offline fasteddie

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Re: Clerical error might have cost N.J. an education grant
« Reply #6 on: 08-26-2010, 08:36am »
"At a news conference Wednesday, Christie accepted responsibility for the mistake, which he called a "clerical error" by a midlevel staffer charged with reviewing a 1,000-page document at the state Department of Education............
There's one change sure to come out of the problem: Christie said the state Education Department would have two workers, rather than one, give a final check to future grant applications."

"mid-level staffer"? "two workers"? If a private corp or university were working on a $400 million proposal, wouldn't they, at the very least, give this to a VP with an entire task group? Heads need to roll on this one, chubby. You lost MY TAX DOLLARS to Ohio! You owe me 400 MILLION DOLLARS.

Offline duke_of_earl

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Re: Clerical error might have cost N.J. an education grant
« Reply #5 on: 08-25-2010, 11:28pm »
So Chris Christie blames the NJEA and the politicians up in Washington, but leaves zero accountability for himself.

Congratulations, Mr. Christie. You are a true New Jersey politician.

Nah, a true NJ politician would have caved into the whims of the NJEA, made the mistake, and then raised taxes permanently to cover the "loss" of grant money.

duke

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Re: Clerical error might have cost N.J. an education grant
« Reply #4 on: 08-25-2010, 05:03pm »
So Chris Christie blames the NJEA and the politicians up in Washington, but leaves zero accountability for himself.

Congratulations, Mr. Christie. You are a true New Jersey politician.

Offline shahaggy

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Re: Clerical error might have cost N.J. an education grant
« Reply #3 on: 08-25-2010, 04:07pm »
Clerical error might have cost N.J. an education grant
Gov. Chris Christie's office is under fire for using the wrong data to fill out "Race to the Top" application


The governor also blamed the New Jersey Education Association, the state's main teachers union, for not supporting the application -- costing points that were given for having others in the state's education community on board.

"What this application proved is that the NJEA is irrelevant," Christie said. "Because with their support, we would have gotten the Race to the Top money."

Before the deadline, Schundler worked out some compromises with the union to win its support.

Dawn Hiltner, a union spokeswoman who was on the committee, provided a draft of the application that included the budget data from the right years. But before that application was submitted, Christie said he wouldn't abide by the compromises -- most of which dealt with how merit pay for teachers would work. The reworked application included the numbers from the wrong years.

Christie said that using the compromise would have cost the state's application even more points that the mistake did.

There's one change sure to come out of the problem: Christie said the state Education Department would have two workers, rather than one, give a final check to future grant applications.

------

Associated Press writer Beth DeFalco in Trenton contributed to this report.

(This version CORRECTS that the governor's news conference was Wednesday, not Tuesday.)



I would like to know how much the teachers union's lack of support really hurt the application, is it quantifiable in numbers like the mistake using the incorrect tax year data?  if so I once again find the union equally at fault.
[04:53 PM] Soshin: I don't think I've ever had fig spread Darna but I like figs and they make my sphincter sing power ballads

[12:48 PM] Bobblehead: Yo, you know I'm really happy for you and Ima let you finish, but soshin had one of the best meercat shouts of all time

[10:23 PM] skwirrlking: you submitting darna for beards eating cupcakes - mca?

[03:24 PM] Darna: [03:22 PM] jeht'aimeu: skw, you are climbing up my pole as well... 

[02:28 PM] propscene: I DPON"T MEAN I LOVE YOU DEEP INSIDE AS MUCH AS I LOVE HIM DEEP INSIDE OH GOD

[12:58 PM] nikki: i feel like i should like the opposite of whatever jehu says

Online jehu

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Re: Clerical error might have cost N.J. an education grant
« Reply #2 on: 08-25-2010, 04:00pm »
You would be surprised at how easy of a mistake that is to make and how often applicants make simple errors like that.

I am surprised that 1) if it had the wrong information it was allowed to go to review 2)  or that the feds didn't ask for updated information due to incorrect submitted data...

either way 400 million is a lot of money to miss out on...
TheFang: yeah, i gotta agree with jehu here

Darna: we had a lovely shat with mrs binky this morning

stephen: Hmm… I'm as clueless as you are.

Darna: could someone please splain to me why a person in a gang is called a gangbanger but a gangbang has nothing to do with gang activity?

shahaggy: can't believe I'm saying this but +1 jehu

[02:58 PM] MCA: it's not stalking, it's caring enough to find out things she won't tell you herself

[01:35 PM] shahaggy: fine but jehu's correct

TheFang: as much as it pains me to say, jehu might be right.

One time, I hired a monkey to take notes for me in class. I would just sit back with my mind completely blank while the monkey scribbled on little pieces of paper. At the end of the week, the teacher said, "Class, I want you to write a pape

Offline TheFang

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Clerical error might have cost N.J. an education grant
« Reply #1 on: 08-25-2010, 03:54pm »
Clerical error might have cost N.J. an education grant
Gov. Chris Christie's office is under fire for using the wrong data to fill out "Race to the Top" application




BY GEOFF MULVIHILL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
HADDONFIELD, N.J. -- For anyone who's ever entered the wrong number on a tax return and been denied a refund, or accidentally overtipped, here's some consolation: A silly error on New Jersey's application for the highly competitive Race to the Top education grants might have cost the state $400 million.

The federal government announced that nine states and the District of Columbia had won the coveted grants. New Jersey was the top runner-up.

A panel judged the lengthy applications on a 500-point scale. New Jersey finished just three points behind Ohio, which received the grant -- and was only barely ahead of Arizona and Louisiana, which didn't.

But New Jersey lost all five points on one section in which officials were asked to show that the state gives a consistent percentage of its revenue to education. The application called for using data from 2008 and 2009 to make the case. New Jersey used figures from the 2010 and 2011 state budgets.

It's not certain that the state would have aced the section if the right numbers had been used -- but it certainly would have done better.

The gaffe was first reported by the Star-Ledger of Newark.

It appears that the governor's administration made the error late in the process before it submitted the application June 1, according to differences between a draft of the application reviewed by The Associated Press and the form that was submitted.

Now Democrats are teeing off on Gov. Chris Christie, a Republican, for the problem.

State Assembly Speaker Sheila Oliver, a Democrat, called it "a stunning mistake that is going to hurt New Jersey's children." Other

At a news conference Wednesday, Christie accepted responsibility for the mistake, which he called a "clerical error" by a midlevel staffer charged with reviewing a 1,000-page document at the state Department of Education.

But he also blamed the administration of President Barack Obama for docking the application because of it.

Education Commissioner Bret Schundler was told about the error at a meeting in Washington this month and provided the correct information, Christie said -- but it was still held against the application, which was reviewed by a national panel of education experts.

The panel appears to be more concerned with technical details than the educational proposals, Christie argued.

"This is the stuff, candidly, that drives people crazy about government and crazy about Washington," he said. "Does anybody in Washington, D.C., have a lick of common sense?"

Christie said his administration would ask the federal Education Department if it can have some of the $100 million left in the Race to the Top fund that hasn't been allocated.

The governor also blamed the New Jersey Education Association, the state's main teachers union, for not supporting the application -- costing points that were given for having others in the state's education community on board.

"What this application proved is that the NJEA is irrelevant," Christie said. "Because with their support, we would have gotten the Race to the Top money."

Before the deadline, Schundler worked out some compromises with the union to win its support.

Dawn Hiltner, a union spokeswoman who was on the committee, provided a draft of the application that included the budget data from the right years. But before that application was submitted, Christie said he wouldn't abide by the compromises -- most of which dealt with how merit pay for teachers would work. The reworked application included the numbers from the wrong years.

Christie said that using the compromise would have cost the state's application even more points that the mistake did.

There's one change sure to come out of the problem: Christie said the state Education Department would have two workers, rather than one, give a final check to future grant applications.

------

Associated Press writer Beth DeFalco in Trenton contributed to this report.

(This version CORRECTS that the governor's news conference was Wednesday, not Tuesday.)
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Clerical error might have cost N.J. an education grant
« Reply #1 on: 08-25-2010, 03:54pm »