Author Topic: Bloomberg looks at extending No. 7 subway line into Hoboken and Secaucus  (Read 7198 times)

Offline MÇA

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New York subway extension to N.J. may not be dead after all
« Reply #22 on: 04-23-2017, 10:03am »
New York subway extension to N.J. may not be dead after all
Larry Higgs | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com
on April 21, 2017 at 5:53 PM

The long-dormant idea to extend a New York subway line to Secaucus may have new life as an alternative to building a colossal Port Authority Bus terminal on Manhattan's West Side.

"Do we leave it out of the discussion? We shouldn't," said Polly Trottenberg, New York City transportation commissioner. "It should be part of the (bus terminal discussion) reset."

Trottenberg said it might be time to reopen discussion of the subway extension after a panel about cross-Hudson River commuting challenges Friday at the Regional Plan Association general assembly.

The idea floated by Michael Bloomberg's administration to extend the No. 7 subway line from its Hudson Yards terminus to the Secaucus Junction train station has floundered since he left office. The idea was brought up by former Port Authority Chairman Scott Rechler, who suggested

The idea was brought up by former Port Authority Chairman Scott Rechler, who suggested the agency study building a bus terminal in Secaucus and rehabilitating, but not expanding, the midtown Manhattan bus terminal.

Former Vice President Joe Biden said it s time for the rest of the nation to step up and fund the Gateway Tunnel project the way metro area taxpayers have funded work in other states.

After political opposition from New Jersey officials, the authority's board endorsed expanding the Manhattan bus terminal. But there has been pushback from neighbors around the bus terminal who fear losing their homes and businesses through eminent domain, and from New York officials.

The RPA discussion focused on two mega projects in various stages of planning and study: Replacing the Port Authority bus terminal at a projected $10 billion and Amtrak's Gateway project to build new Hudson River rail tunnels, a Penn Station annex and other projects, estimated to cost $24 billion.

"Is the only solution a massive bus terminal when other global cities are going with rail?" Trottenberg said. "I'm not saying we don't need a bus terminal. Let's broaden the mix of solutions. It can't just be one."

The No. 7 to Secaucus has been endorsed by the New Jersey Association of Railroad Passengers, who said it would take pressure off the Lincoln Tunnel and bus terminal and would give commuters a faster ride, since many already transfer to city subways. Read more

Offline Bobblehead

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Really good news. If it ever happens, it would relieve congestion on the PATH.

Does Lhota realize that we get across the river for $2.25 now?

How did I miss this gem? Lhota really is a consummate ass, and an idiot.
Sanctimonious bleater.

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Offline MÇA

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Committee green lights expansion of NYC subway to Hoboken
« Reply #20 on: 11-26-2013, 12:20pm »
Committee green lights expansion of NYC subway to Hoboken
By Kathryn Brenzel/NJ.com
on November 26, 2013 at 7:07 AM, updated November 26, 2013 at 11:28 AM
 
HOBOKEN— A state Assembly committee on Monday favored the proposed expansion of a New York City subway into New Jersey, a modest step for a plan that would provide another connection between Hoboken and Manhattan.

The Assembly Transportation, Public Works and Independent Authorities Committee pushed through a resolution in support of expanding the New York City Number 7 subway into New Jersey, according to the state legislature's website. The extension would include stops in Hoboken and Secaucus and bring 128,000 more riders per day between Manhattan and New Jersey, according to the resolution.

The resolution follows the 2010 cancelation of Governor Chris Christie's Access to the Region's Core Tunnel project, which included two new rail tunnels under the Hudson River between New Jersey and Manhattan. A feasibility report released in April by the New York City Economic Development Corporation was a game changer, according to the resolution.

The report found that the extension would increase ridership and provide commuters with a direct route to Grand Central Terminal and other major New York City subway routes, according to the resolution.

According to NJBiz, the resolution faces an uphill battle. Though the committee voted to release the resolution for further consideration, legislators testified on Monday that alternatives should be explored, NJBiz reported.   

Offline moelissa

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Does Lhota realize that we get across the river for $2.25 now?
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Offline garyg

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Where would they put access?  I imagine it would be further uptown in Hoboken, which unfortunately makes it's usefulness and effect to JC minimal.  But I'm not an urban planner so who knows.

Offline MÇA

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Plan to extend No. 7 subway from NYC to New Jersey could be back on track
By Mike Frassinelli/The Star-Ledger
on April 10, 2013 at 7:19 AM, updated April 10, 2013 at 9:10 AM

Traveling by subway from Secaucus to the Mets' Citi Field may resurface as a possibility.

A plan to extend the No. 7 New York City subway to New Jersey, presumed dead a year ago when the chairman of the New York MTA said it wouldn’t happen “in anybody’s lifetime,” could be revived.

A report commissioned by New York City, expected to be posted this morning on the city's Economic Development Corp. website, extols the benefits of the plan.

"The extension of the No. 7 Subway would result in the first trans-Hudson tunnel connection that would provide direct rail access from New Jersey, not only to the West Side of Manhattan, but also to the East Side and multiple locations in Queens," noted the report by the Parsons Brinckerhoff engineering firm. "It would provide needed capacity across the Hudson River and advance the broader goal of enhancing regional connectivity."

The report, obtained by The Star-Ledger, noted the next step would be an advanced study on the feasibility of extending the No. 7 subway line — which runs from Queens to Times Square — into Secaucus Junction. Coordinated with the Federal Transit Administration, the study would include a cost benefit analysis, identification of financing opportunities and analysis of ridership and revenue.

After Gov. Chris Christie in October 2010 canceled the $9.8 billion ARC tunnel from Secaucus to West 34th Street in Manhattan, New York’s plan to extend the No. 7 train to New Jersey was one of two Hudson River train tunnel alternatives that sprung up in the next few months, along with Amtrak’s proposed Gateway Tunnel from Secaucus to the south side of an expanded New York Penn Station.

But the options were seemingly cut to one last April when then-MTA Chairman Joe Lhota, now a city mayor hopeful, told a forum of New York business leaders the No. 7 extension would be too expensive.

“It’s not going to happen,” he said. “Not in our lifetime. Not in anybody’s lifetime.”

“Of course New Jersey would like to have it,” Lhota added. “They think they’re going to get across the river for $2.50.”

He instead threw his support behind the $13.5 billion Gateway Tunnel, which initially was scheduled to be built by 2020 but so far has received just $30 million.

The Gateway project would allow 13 more NJ Transit trains during peak hours — for a total of 33 — and eight more Amtrak trains.

The Parsons Brinckerhoff report contended that the No. 7 subway project would be compatible with the proposed Gateway plan. Those hopping on a 7 train in Jersey would be able to reach such destinations as the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, Times Square, Grand Central Terminal and Citi Field, home of the New York Mets.

It would allow for about 128,000 riders a day on 30 trains per hour, according to the report, and the trip from Secaucus Junction to Grand Central would take about 16 minutes.

Christie canceled the Access to the Region’s Core tunnel because he said he didn’t want New Jerseyans to be on the hook for billions of dollars in cost overruns and was concerned the tunnel didn’t provide easily accessible train connections in Manhattan. He has been receptive to both the Gateway project and No. 7 subway train project.

Offline CeeDub

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From Shahaggy's favourite fishwrapper:
By choosing Mr. Lhota, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo made a bet that political acumen and financial skill can best steer the agency toward the stability that has long escaped it.

Still, while Mr. Lhota, a Brooklyn Heights resident, routinely rides the No. 2 express to work, he has little experience with the vagaries of running a mass transit system, particularly one as sprawling and creaky as the authority’s aging network of subways, buses, commuter trains, tunnels and bridges.


Lhota is a trustee of the City University of New York, and is a graduate of Georgetown University and the Harvard Business School.
He worked at Paine Webber, then the CIty of New York, was Deputy Mayor under Rudy "they were told to wear their respirators" Giulani, for which he was rewarded with 8 years at Cablevison and 18 months at MSG.

So now you know!

he may also have a house on Miacomet Ave, valued at around $1.7m  :nerd:

Offline shahaggy

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I'm not ordinarily surprised when New Yorkers aren't aware of the PATH, but an MTA Chairman?  Seriously?

he's probably never ridden on public transportation and takes a car service paid for by the tax payers
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Offline Bad Circles

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I'm not ordinarily surprised when New Yorkers aren't aware of the PATH, but an MTA Chairman?  Seriously?

Offline Bobblehead

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For the new train, we should make the fare to NYC $0.00 and the return trip $4.00.
Sanctimonious bleater.

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Offline TheFang

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"Of course New Jersey would like to have it — they think they’re going to get across the river for $2.50," Lhota told the New York Building Congress. "Not a chance. It’s not going to happen. Not in our lifetime. Not in anybody’s lifetime."


Fuck you. I prefer getting across the river for $2.00
"I can't help it, I'm a greedy slob. It's my hobby." -- D.D.

Offline MÇA

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MTA head: Extension of No. 7 subway to N.J. would cost too much, won't happen 'in anybody's lifetime'
Published: Wednesday, April 04, 2012, 6:35 AM
Updated: Wednesday, April 04, 2012, 8:31 AM
Star-Ledger Staff

NEW YORK — The head of the New York MTA said Tuesday an extension of the No. 7 subway line to New Jersey won’t happen "in anybody’s lifetime," instantly cutting New Jersey’s trans-Hudson train tunnel choices to one.

The only proposal left on the table is the Gateway Tunnel from Secaucus to an expanded New York Penn Station, Amtrak’s alternative to a commuter rail tunnel project terminated 18 months ago by Gov. Chris Christie.

Metropolitan Transportation Authority Chairman Joe Lhota told a forum of business leaders in New York that despite efforts by Mayor Michael Bloomberg to extend the No. 7 line to Secaucus, it would cost too much to build a tunnel and train yard.

"Of course New Jersey would like to have it — they think they’re going to get across the river for $2.50," Lhota told the New York Building Congress. "Not a chance. It’s not going to happen. Not in our lifetime. Not in anybody’s lifetime."

Lhota instead threw his support to the Gateway Tunnel.

It was a victory for Amtrak and U.S. Sen Frank Lautenberg (D-N.J.), who announced the Gateway project in February 2011 as the best alternative to the scrapped Access to the Region’s Core tunnel, which was to run from Secaucus to a station under West 34th Street.

"As we look at the transportation challenges ahead, Amtrak’s Gateway Tunnel is the best option for New Jersey commuters and the entire region," he said.

The $13.5 billion Gateway Tunnel was scheduled to be built by 2020, but the project so far has received just $15 million. The tunnel would allow another 13 NJ Transit trains during peak hours — from 20 to 33 — and eight more Amtrak trains.

Anthony Coscia, an Amtrak board member from New Jersey appointed by President Obama in 2010, praised Lhota for supporting an Amtrak project ahead of one his own agency would control.

Christie said he canceled the $9.8 billion ARC tunnel because he didn’t want New Jerseyans to pay cost overruns for a tunnel that didn’t provide train connections in Manhattan and for which New York was not paying its fair share.

He has been receptive to both the Gateway project and extending the No. 7 subway — which goes to Citi Field in Queens — to New Jersey.

Offline MÇA

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New Yorkers rankled at thought of extending subway into N.J.
« Reply #10 on: 11-21-2010, 11:33am »
New Yorkers rankled at thought of extending subway into N.J.
Published: Saturday, November 20, 2010, 2:22 PM
Updated: Saturday, November 20, 2010, 2:22 PM
The Associated Press

SECAUCUS — Could New York's subway be going suburban?

A proposal to extend the No. 7 line across the Hudson River has straphangers atwitter, with some wondering how the new connection might change the character of the city's beloved trains.

"The idea of it going to New Jersey — oh my God," said Lorraine Diehl, a dyed-in-the-wool New Yorker and author of a book about the subway. "Eek! You'll come back with germs."

New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg confirmed this week that the city is studying whether to extend its No. 7 line from the far west side of Manhattan and under the Hudson to Secaucus, N.J. It would be the subway's only stop outside New York City limits. Bloomberg called the $5.3 billion plan "very clever."

Die-hard New Yorkers were incredulous. "You've got to be kidding me," said Linda Baran, president of the Staten Island Chamber of Commerce. She called the plan a slap in the face to the only subway-free borough, where people have been begging Bloomberg for better public transit for years.

The proposal set off fierce debates on online transit forums like SubChat.com and RailRoad.net, with many New York posters calling the idea a waste of money. The Straphangers Campaign wants the city to ensure it can meet its other obligations, like finishing an unfinanced subway line along New York's Second Avenue, said Gene Russianoff, the association's staff attorney.

Bloomberg says extending the No. 7 could be an elegant replacement for another tunnel project that fizzled last month when New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie balked at the $9 billion to $14 billion price tag. Christie said taxpayers couldn't afford to bear the cost for years of the nation's most costly public works project, which would have doubled the commuting capacity of New Jersey residents taking Amtrak or NJ Transit trains to work.

Construction of a multibillion-dollar, 1.5-mile extension that would take the No. 7 from Times Square to the Hudson riverbank is already under way. The proposed tunnel under the Hudson would cost $5.3 billion and extend the line to the Secaucus Junction station, where straphangers could switch to New Jersey commuter train lines. The proposal is preliminary, and officials haven't firmed up who would pay for what.

The debate has tapped into the long-standing rivalry between New Yorkers and their neighbors across the Hudson, said Jack Eichenbaum, historian for the borough of Queens. Depending on which side of the river you're on, New Yorkers are egocentric jerks and New Jerseyans backwater rubes.

"People say 'Why go to New Jersey? That's a whole other place!'" Eichenbaum said. (more)

Offline duke_of_earl

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It would be great if they would also look into running the 1 and 9 (or maybe the E) lines into Jersey City and Bayonne.

At that point the MTA could simply take over PATH operations from the Port Authority.  But the disasters that would bring would be horrific.  Trash cans inside the turnstiles for public use, access to the rest of the subway line for one fare.  Carrying a single fare card.  Terrible idea, terrible.

duke

Offline MÇA

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Extend a Subway Line Under the Hudson? For Two Men, It’s Hardly a New Idea
By PATRICK McGEEHAN
Published: November 17, 2010
 
Steve Lanset said he was “totally blown away” when he read on his computer on Tuesday night that New York City officials were thinking of extending a subway line to New Jersey.

Mr. Lanset, who lives in Jersey City, liked the idea. Indeed, he has liked it for, oh, about five years, since he helped create a Web site dedicated to it — SubwaytoSecaucus.com. But judging by the response to that site, few people warmed up to the idea.

“It didn’t seem to have the wildfire effect that we had hoped,” Mr. Lanset said Wednesday.

His collaborator, Ralph Braskett, said he had received a lot of “abuse” and very little praise for promoting a subway stop alongside the New Jersey Turnpike.

Thus, the two men were more than a little surprised to learn that stretching the No. 7 line westward to Secaucus was gaining traction at City Hall.

After a plan for a commuter-train tunnel under the Hudson River was scrapped, some developers have convinced city officials that a subway extension could be the next best solution. They estimated it could double the capacity for commuters into the city at about half the price of the rail tunnel, which Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey said would cost billions of dollars more than his state could afford.

On Wednesday, Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg attributed the idea to recent “thinking totally out of the box” by Robert Steel, his new deputy mayor for economic development. (more)

Offline Woodsy

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It would be great if they would also look into running the 1 and 9 (or maybe the E) lines into Jersey City and Bayonne.

Offline MÇA

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Hudson County officials welcome New York City subway expansion
Published: Wednesday, November 17, 2010, 6:23 PM
Updated: Wednesday, November 17, 2010, 8:32 PM
Melissa Hayes/The Jersey Journal

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg's hope to extend the No. 7 subway line under the Hudson River may be a long way from becoming a reality, but he won’t have to go far to find support in the Garden State. “I love it and I am going to do everything I can to make it happen,” Hoboken Mayor Dawn Zimmer said yesterday. “It is an amazing opportunity for Hoboken.”

The Bloomberg administration’s exploration of extending the subway line to Hoboken and Secaucus became public Tuesday when staff said the mayor was looking at it as a possible alternative to the Access to the Region’s Core or ARC tunnel. The plan is only in its infancy, but with an estimated $5.3 billion price tag, it's cheaper than the rail tunnel.

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority is already extending the No. 7 from Times Square to West 34th Street and 11th Avenue, close to the Hudson River. Tunneling under the river to Hudson County would give commuters in the most congested part of the state another way to get to New York City, local officials said.

“Anything that helps people move around more easily in North Jersey is a good thing and secondly, anything that New York City is willing to help pay for is a good thing also, that was my object to the (ARC) tunnel,” said Assemblywoman Joan Quigley, D-32nd of Jersey City, whose district includes Secaucus.

The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey and federal government each contributed $3 billion toward the ARC tunnel project with New Jersey on the hook for the rest of the tab. Gov. Chris Christie squashed the project late last month saying it was set to exceed the $8 billion budget.

Freeholder Anthony Romano, of Hoboken, a Mets fan envisions a transfer-less ride to see his team play in Queens -- the No. 7 terminates in Flushing. “Obviously I’m supportive of anything that’s good for economic growth and jobs and also for Hudson County people, to get them to work, and also it’s an improvement to the transportation system,” he said. Romano said he would support the plan as long as residents’ homes wouldn’t be impacted by construction. “Obviously the ARC tunnel at this time is not going anywhere so that would be an alternative,” he said.

While the No. 7 could be an alternative for Hudson County residents, it wouldn’t serve as a replacement to the ARC tunnel overall. ARC, which involved laying new track, would have provided transfer-free service to Manhattan on the Main Line, Bergen County Line, Pascack Valley Line, Raritan Valley Line, Port Jervis Line, North Jersey Coast Line south of Long Branch, Morristown Line west of Dover and Boonton Line west of Montclair State University. ARC would have also provided more frequent and express service on the North East Corridor, New Jersey Coast Line, Morristown Line, Montclair Line and Gladstone Branch.

Not everyone in Hudson County is quick to through the project their support. U.S. Rep. Albio Sires, D-13 of West New York, said through a spokesman he wants more information on the proposal. Sen. Nicholas Sacco, mayor of North Bergen, said through a spokesman he supports the project in theory but wants more specifics.

Offline TheFang

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Nope. They'd dig a new tunnel, which I assume they could make spit out anywhere they wanted.
"I can't help it, I'm a greedy slob. It's my hobby." -- D.D.

Offline CeeDub

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Sure, because 34th is right across from Hoboken, right?  And the subway cars will have Transformer-capability to operate on the Light rail tracks that goes thru the tunnel in . . . Weehawken?  And the whole are is easily accessible by pedestrians, right?

google map

« Last Edit: 11-17-2010, 12:38pm by CeeDub »

Offline MÇA

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Nice out-of-the-box thinking by the Bloombergians. I'm assuming that by Secaucus, they mean the Frank R. Lautenberg Secaucus Junction Station?

Offline TheFang

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Christie spokesman Michael Drewniak said the New Jersey governor would listen to new ideas to solve the "trans-Hudson transportation dilemma." "But — and this is a big but — any plausible plan would ... have to be fair to New Jersey as far as cost sharing between all benefiting jurisdictions," he said.

He also added "It would also have to cause the least amount of actual walking for Christie's wife as well."
"I can't help it, I'm a greedy slob. It's my hobby." -- D.D.

Offline MÇA

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Bloomberg administration looks at extending No. 7 subway line into Hoboken and Secaucus
Published: Tuesday, November 16, 2010, 11:23 PM
Updated: Wednesday, November 17, 2010, 7:55 AM
The Associated Press

Policymakers in Mayor Michael Bloomberg's administration have been discussing whether it would be possible to extend the No. 7 subway line under the Hudson River to Hoboken and then Secaucus, a city official said today. But there are major logistical, financial and political hurdles that would need to be overcome.

The estimated $5 billion to $6 billion plan would be about half the cost of a proposal to build a second commuter rail tunnel under the river that was killed last month by the Garden State's Republican governor, Chris Christie, because of potential cost overruns.

The alternative idea to extend the No. 7 line would cost less because the city is already digging a tunnel to run the subway from Times Square to West 34th Street and 11th Avenue, said Andrew Brent, a spokesman for the deputy mayor for economic development, Robert K. Steel. Extending the line beyond the city for the first time, under the river from Manhattan's West Side, through Hoboken and on to Secaucus would save money, he said.

"Like others, we're looking at — and open to discussing — any creative, fiscally responsible alternatives," Brent said. "Extending the 7 line to New Jersey could address many of the region's transportation capacity issues at a fraction of the original tunnel's cost, but the idea is still in its earliest stages." The idea was first reported by The New York Times on its website Tuesday.

Before it goes anywhere, the plan would have to be supported by Christie, Bloomberg, an independent, and New York Gov.-elect Andrew M. Cuomo, a Democrat. A spokesman for Cuomo didn't immediately respond to an e-mailed request for comment.

Christie spokesman Michael Drewniak said the New Jersey governor would listen to new ideas to solve the "trans-Hudson transportation dilemma." "But — and this is a big but — any plausible plan would ... have to be fair to New Jersey as far as cost sharing between all benefiting jurisdictions," he said.

New York's U.S. Sen. Charles E. Schumer, a Democrat, offered his support in obtaining federal funds to make the idea work. "This is a bold idea that must be given serious and immediate consideration," he said in a statement.

None of the stake holders has been briefed about the idea, Brent said. It emerged out of discussions among policymakers in Steel's office, the city's Department of Planning and the city's Hudson Yards Development Corp. after Christie killed the plan for the so-called Access to the Region's Core project.

The $8.7 billion project to construct a second rail tunnel between New Jersey and New York was 15 years in the making when Christie killed it on Oct. 27. New Jersey was expected to shoulder $2.7 billion of the costs, plus overruns. The federal government and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey had each committed $3 billion to the project.

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