Author Topic: Christie's bully act getting old  (Read 4461 times)

Offline shahaggy

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 910
    • View Profile
Re: Chris Christie lays out a national vision
« Reply #4 on: 02-17-2011, 12:08pm »
 ::)   

it was a great speech haters
[04:53 PM] Soshin: I don't think I've ever had fig spread Darna but I like figs and they make my sphincter sing power ballads

[12:48 PM] Bobblehead: Yo, you know I'm really happy for you and Ima let you finish, but soshin had one of the best meercat shouts of all time

[10:23 PM] skwirrlking: you submitting darna for beards eating cupcakes - mca?

[03:24 PM] Darna: [03:22 PM] jeht'aimeu: skw, you are climbing up my pole as well... 

[02:28 PM] propscene: I DPON"T MEAN I LOVE YOU DEEP INSIDE AS MUCH AS I LOVE HIM DEEP INSIDE OH GOD

[12:58 PM] nikki: i feel like i should like the opposite of whatever jehu says

Online jehu

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 875
    • View Profile
Re: Chris Christie lays out a national vision
« Reply #3 on: 02-17-2011, 12:06pm »
If he really wants national exposure, he should be the spokes person for Jenny Craig.
« Last Edit: 06-01-2011, 11:37am by MCA »
TheFang: yeah, i gotta agree with jehu here

Darna: we had a lovely shat with mrs binky this morning

stephen: Hmm… I'm as clueless as you are.

Darna: could someone please splain to me why a person in a gang is called a gangbanger but a gangbang has nothing to do with gang activity?

shahaggy: can't believe I'm saying this but +1 jehu

[02:58 PM] MCA: it's not stalking, it's caring enough to find out things she won't tell you herself

[01:35 PM] shahaggy: fine but jehu's correct

TheFang: as much as it pains me to say, jehu might be right.

One time, I hired a monkey to take notes for me in class. I would just sit back with my mind completely blank while the monkey scribbled on little pieces of paper. At the end of the week, the teacher said, "Class, I want you to write a pape

Offline TheFang

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1673
    • View Profile
Chris Christie lays out a national vision
« Reply #2 on: 02-17-2011, 12:04pm »
Chris Christie lays out a national vision



Gov. Chris Christie today delivered a broadside against the broken politics of Washington and the need for straight talk to solve the country's problems in a speech that will stoke talk of a 2012 presidential bid by the New Jersey Republican.

"I look at what's happening in Washington right now and I am worried," said Christie in an address at the American Enterprise Institute. "What game is being played down here is irresponsible and it's dangerous."

Asked whether he would consider running for president in 2012, Christie acknowledged that he "sees the opportunity" but quickly added: "That's not a reason to be president of the United States."

And yet, Christie's speech, which spanned roughly 45 minutes, had all the traditional markers of someone eyeing national office.

"Leadership today in America has to be about doing the big things and being courageous," said Christie. At another point, Christie argued that "we have to bring a new approach and a new discipline to this."

Christie repeatedly drew on his experiences in New Jersey -- tightening the state's budget, facing down public-sector unions -- to draw a harsh contrast with the kick-the-can-down-the-road-ism that he believes has infected politics in Washington.

Dismissing the "old playbook" of putting off hard choices until after the next -- and then the next -- election, Christie noted that after the 2012 election Medicare will be less than five years away from insolvency. "My childrens' future is more important than some political strategy," said Christie. "We need to say these things and we need to say them out loud."

Christie insisted that "restoring and maintaining fiscal sanity", reforming health and pension benefits and "reforming an education system that costs too much and produces too little" should be the sole focus of the country's leaders.

That trio of issues are "not partisan...they are obvious," said Christie, noting that Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D-N.Y.) and he have taken very similar approaches to solving what have long been considered intractable problems. (Christie repeatedly referenced Cuomo in the speech, at one point referring to himself and the New York governor as "soulmates".)

Christie's speech was couched in the sort of populist, average Joe tone that has rapidly become his trademark.

Recounting threats from Democratic state legislators that they would shut down the state government rather than pass his budget, Christie said he told the pols that he had no plans to sleep in his office -- as his predecessor in the job had done --but would rather head to the governor's mansion, "open a beer, order a pizza and watch the Mets".

Christie later said that when he went to speak to a group of union workers who were angry with him, he crumpled up his notes, threw them on the ground and told the crowd that he was the only politician willing to tell them the truth.

And, he added to that straight-talking reputation by offering a critique of his own party -- most notably on the idea of American exceptionalism, a principle that former Govs. Mitt Romney (Mass.) and Tim Pawlenty (Minn.) have embraced whole-heartedly as they prepare to run for president in 2012.

"American exceptionalism has to include the courage to do the right thing," said Christie.

The speech, which Politico's Mike Allen billed as a "D.C. rollout" for the New Jersey governor, is sure to stir speculation -- despite Christie's protestations to the contrary -- that a national bid is on the horizon for him.

As we have argued in this space before, there is a slot for an tea party economic conservative in the field. Christie is the most obvious person in the party who could step in and fill that spot.

We take him at his word that he doesn't believe he is ready to be president just yet. But, speeches like the one he gave today at AEI will do little to diminish the demand for his voice to be heard at the national level.

Politics -- as President Obama proved in 2008 -- is about seeing opportunity and taking it. Christie, as he himself acknowledged today, has an opportunity. Will he grasp it?


By Chris Cillizza  | February 16, 2011; 2:42 PM ET
« Last Edit: 06-01-2011, 11:36am by MCA »
"I can't help it, I'm a greedy slob. It's my hobby." -- D.D.

Offline TheFang

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1673
    • View Profile
Christie's bully act getting old
« Reply #1 on: 12-08-2010, 11:13am »
Christie's bully act getting old

Star-Ledger Editorial Board Star-Ledger Editorial Board

Two years ago, when Chris Christie announced he was running for governor, he dismissed questions about his days as the Godzilla freeholder — when he breathed fire on almost every issue, insulted Morris County colleagues and needlessly stomped on countless toes. Tossed out after one term, Christie assured us he had learned his lesson. He was a different man.

“Who wouldn’t be?” he said. “If you’re not a different person 12 years later than when I began my last political campaign, you’ve got problems.” He added: “I’m more mature.”

Nearly a year after he was elected, we wonder: Where’s the maturity?

The latest display of contempt for anyone who disagrees with him was on display at a town hall meeting Friday in Parsippany.

Keith Chaudruc, of Madison, asked the governor how he could sign off on a tax cut for the rich while lunch-pail stiffs were hit with painful increases like transit fare hikes. After some give and take, Christie invited Chaudruc to the stage for “a conversation.”

Chaudruc, reluctant to be part of another Christie YouTube moment, was escorted to the stage by a state trooper. Chaudruc never got another word in. Twice Chaudruc’s size, Christie crowded his personal space, raised his voice and lectured him on economics with a wagging finger. Each time Chaudruc tried to make a point, Christie cut him off.

When Christie finished, Chaudruc motioned for the microphone. This was, after all, a “conversation.” Christie shooed him away and a trooper herded Chaudruc off stage.

The clip appears on YouTube under the title “Christie rips apart rude questioner,” a headline written, no doubt, by a Christie disciple.

By bullying a citizen, hogging the microphone and condescendingly dismissing him, Christie was the rude one. But it’s nothing new.

Christie has turned state politics into one never-ending yo’ mama joke. It doesn’t matter who you are — school superintendent, teacher, student, U.S. senator, state Assembly leader, former education commissioner or just a regular guy trying to have a conversation: If you disagree with him, Christie will try to humiliate you publicly.

Some find Christie entertaining, but his combativeness is counterproductive and breeds the kind of hate speech that plaques the nation.

And it’s not very mature.
"I can't help it, I'm a greedy slob. It's my hobby." -- D.D.

Jersey City, NJ Community Forums

Christie's bully act getting old
« Reply #1 on: 12-08-2010, 11:13am »