Author Topic: Bicycle sharing coming to Jersey City?  (Read 18055 times)

Offline MÇA

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Jersey City, Hoboken spar over :bike: parking
« Reply #43 on: 03-30-2016, 11:10am »
:bike:
Jersey City, Hoboken spar over bike parking
Terrence T. McDonald | The Jersey Journal
on March 29, 2016 at 8:22 AM, updated March 29, 2016 at 8:26 AM

A quarrel over bikes is pitting Jersey City against neighboring Mile Square City. At issue are bicycles from Hoboken's Hudson Bike Share system that last fall began showing up en masse at Jersey City's public bike racks.

Jersey City officials believe Hudson Bike is bringing the bikes over to Jersey City by the dozen — a charge Hoboken disputes — and competing with Jersey City's own Citi Bike system.

The disagreement has led Jersey City council members to introduce a measure aimed at restricting how long commercial bikes can be parked at public bike racks, a response to the charge that Hudson Bike is "hogging" racks near PATH stations. Unlike Citi Bike bicycles, Hudson Bike bikes do not need to be parked at specific locations.

Meanwhile, a planned Citi Bike Jersey City station just outside the Hoboken PATH station — craved by Citi Bike users who use that PATH line to commute into New York City — has been kiboshed for now as officials with the two cities trade barbs.

"It is disappointing to see such a regressive transportation proposal from our usually progressive neighbor in Jersey City," Hoboken Mayor Dawn Zimmer said in a statement to The Jersey Journal, referring to the measure introduced by the council last week. "Targeting bike-share bikes in this manner has no legitimate governmental purpose and would be an unfortunate step back for urban transportation."

Ward E Councilwoman Candice Osborne is leading the charge on Jersey City's end.

"We must honor our contract with Citi Bike and prevent private companies from monopolizing public bike racks at the expense of Jersey City residents," Osborne said.

Hoboken, Jersey City and Weehawken were once in talks to create a bike-share system together, but Jersey City Mayor Steve Fulop opted to join the Citi Bike system instead, and Weehawken Mayor Richard Turner said he didn't want to raise money to fund a bike-share program. Hudson Bike Share launched in Hoboken in October.

Jersey City residents began telling Obsorne in November that they saw Downtown bike racks stocked with Hudson Bike bicycles as early as 6:30 a.m. Osborne believes this shows the company behind Hoboken's system is bringing large numbers of bikes over to Jersey City, though Zimmer told Fulop in a Nov. 10 email that "the only bikes that have ended up in Jersey City are from riders who have taken them there."

Zimmer, Fulop and Osborne began negotiating, with Zimmer in the Nov. 10 email saying Citi Bike Jersey City could install a bike station near the Hoboken PATH station if Jersey City would allow Hudson Bike to install three dedicated bike racks at the Newport, Exchange Place and Grove Street PATH stations. Osborne in response said she would be OK with three Hudson Bike racks in Jersey City in exchange for three Citi Bike Jersey City stations in Hoboken. Read more

Offline shahaggy

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Zimmer, who was at the League of Municipalities conference in Atlantic City last week, did not respond directly to a question about Osborne’s comments. But city spokesman Juan Melli said, “The assertion that our bike share operator is bringing bikes to Jersey City is false. Mayor Zimmer is working directly with Mayor Fulop to resolve this amicably with the overall good of providing more bike parking options for residents in both Jersey City and Hoboken since residents from both communities would benefit from greater connectivity.”


----- well this is a blatant lie, how did those bikes get to Jersey City and Liberty State Park if they weren't transported to those locations originally by the company when they set up those extra docking zones.  Am I to believe someone from Hoboken rode the bike to LSP, locked it took a cab home instead? ::)  ::)

[04:53 PM] Soshin: I don't think I've ever had fig spread Darna but I like figs and they make my sphincter sing power ballads

[12:48 PM] Bobblehead: Yo, you know I'm really happy for you and Ima let you finish, but soshin had one of the best meercat shouts of all time

[10:23 PM] skwirrlking: you submitting darna for beards eating cupcakes - mca?

[03:24 PM] Darna: [03:22 PM] jeht'aimeu: skw, you are climbing up my pole as well... 

[02:28 PM] propscene: I DPON"T MEAN I LOVE YOU DEEP INSIDE AS MUCH AS I LOVE HIM DEEP INSIDE OH GOD

[12:58 PM] nikki: i feel like i should like the opposite of whatever jehu says

Offline MÇA

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Mind your own rack!

Tension erupts over Hoboken, Jersey City bike share programs
by Al Sullivan and Steven Rodas
Reporter staff writers
Nov 22, 2015

Jersey City and Hoboken’s relatively new bike share programs – which were once supposed to be linked but ended up being run separately – have had their ups and downs throughout their first couple of months.

At the outset in January 2014, Hoboken, Weehawken, and Jersey City announced a collaborative 50-station system throughout all three towns. But ultimately, Jersey City opted to be included in New York City’s CitiBike program, which allows riders to link to the popular system in use in Manhattan. Hoboken launched Hudson Bike Share instead, while Weehawken chose not to pursue a bike share at all.

As Hoboken’s program has been slower to start, it hit some bumps in the road.

A Jersey City official was enraged recently when she found out that the vendor supplying bicycles to Hoboken’s Hudson Bike Share program appeared to be placing bikes in public racks in Jersey City. A resident of Jersey City complained to Councilwoman Candice Osborne that a rack in Jersey City was completely filled with Hoboken bicycles.

Osborne told The Reporter that when she contacted Hoboken Mayor Dawn Zimmer about the issue, Zimmer offered to broker a deal that would allow Hoboken bicycles to be stationed in Jersey City, and offered Jersey City the option of locating some CitiBike stations in Hoboken.

But Zimmer may just be spinning her wheels in trying to make such a trade. Osborne wasn’t having it.

“[This is] totally, 1,000 percent wrong and will be addressed,” Osborne posted publicly on her Facebook page. “Jersey City has a bike share program, CitiBike, which has locations that do not impede on the existing bike racks for use by the public. It is telling that the bike share program chosen by Hoboken and Weehawken can’t work without Jersey City. Regardless, their bad decision is not our problem. They can approach us with an alternate solution that 1) doesn’t include taking existing public bike spaces and 2) compensates us for use of our space. We aren’t here to subsidize private business at the expense of public use.”

Osborne told The Reporter, “We made an informed decision to do what was best for Jersey City residents. Obviously joining the largest network that is available all over NYC makes the most sense, with the potential to cut daily commuting costs in half or sometimes up to two thirds. In the long term we want our riders to experience the largest network effect possible, without needing to purchase two separate services. I think there is room for collaboration with Hoboken. But it must not be done in secret, without permission and by taking up bike racks currently in use by the Jersey City public. If Jersey City public space is going to be utilized for Hoboken bike share, then it is only fair that Jersey City get an equal number of public spaces for our bike share in Hoboken. I think that would be a win-win.”

Zimmer, who was at the League of Municipalities conference in Atlantic City last week, did not respond directly to a question about Osborne’s comments. But city spokesman Juan Melli said, “The assertion that our bike share operator is bringing bikes to Jersey City is false. Mayor Zimmer is working directly with Mayor Fulop to resolve this amicably with the overall good of providing more bike parking options for residents in both Jersey City and Hoboken since residents from both communities would benefit from greater connectivity.”

The Hoboken program does have significant ridership among Jersey City residents, according to statistics issued by Hoboken.

“To date, more than 100 Jersey City residents have registered for Hudson Bike Share, and many Hoboken residents are using the system to get to work in Jersey City,” said Hoboken city spokesman Juan Melli.

Osborne said she is almost certain that the bike company supplying Hoboken had deliberately parked the Hoboken bikes in Jersey City.

“Bikes don’t just randomly end up on one rack all next to each other like that,” she said. “That isn’t normal distribution at 6:30 in the morning. They claimed they didn’t do that - but I don’t believe them. Look at the picture on my [Facebook] wall and you can make your own judgment. The one bike that isn’t Hudson Bike is from the resident who sent me the picture. All the rest are theirs at 6:30 a.m. I don’t believe in that kind of chance.”

Read more

Offline MÇA

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More than 19K trips taken on Citi :bike: Jersey City, :fulop: says
By Terrence T. McDonald | The Jersey Journal
on October 27, 2015 at 11:18 AM   

More than 19,000 trips have been taken on Citi Bike Jersey City since it launched last month, and over 1,000 people have signed up for the bike-share system, city officials announced today.

As expected, much of the traffic occurred along the PATH system. Officials said 30 percent of the trips that have been taken since the Sept. 21 launch began or ended at transit hubs.

City officials said they could not release more specifics — such as data showing which of the city's 35 stations are most heavily used — because that information has not yet been compiled.

"The numbers prove what we expected all along: that Jersey City would welcome a bike share and wanted a system that connected with New York City as well," Mayor Steve Fulop said in a statement.

[...]

More than 1,100 Jersey City residents have signed up for Citi Bike Jersey City since its launch, bringing the total number of city subscribers to 2,079, officials said. Read more

Offline MÇA

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Re: Bicycle sharing coming to Jersey City?
« Reply #39 on: 09-21-2015, 04:39pm »
Fulop: Citi Bike Jersey City launch 'one of the most exciting things'
By Terrence T. McDonald | The Jersey Journal
on September 21, 2015 at 3:51 PM, updated September 21, 2015 at 4:03 PM

JERSEY CITY — Citi Bike Jersey City launched this afternoon with a 1,000-foot bike ride from the Newark Avenue pedestrian plaza to City Hall, a helmeted Mayor Steve Fulop leading the way.

Citi Bike, the popular bike-sharing program that has over 7,000 bikes in New York City, is adding 350 bikes at 35 stations throughout Jersey City. Jay Walder, president and CEO of Motivate, which is managing the program, said today that Citi Bike has proven successful "in cities where there's lots to see and do."

"And no place is more exciting right now than Jersey City," Walder said. "Citi Bike and Jersey City are a perfect match."

Fulop has been working since he became mayor in July 2013 to implement a bike-sharing system here, saying it will make people healthier and get exhaust-spewing vehicles off the road. Today, he called Citi Bike Jersey City "nothing short of ... the first new regional transportation system" launched in the area in decades.

"This is one of the most exciting things that we've been a part of for the last two years," Fulop said.

The city backed out of a bike-sharing system with Hoboken and Weehawken so that it could connect with Citi Bike New York. Fulop said it was the right choice because Jersey City residents can hop on a Citi Bike, ride it to a PATH station, dock it there, and then grab a Citi Bike New York bike outside a PATH station on the other side of the Hudson River.

The $2 million program is being funded with private donations, Fulop noted today. Read more

Offline MÇA

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Residents ready to ride as Citi Bike racks are installed around Jersey City
By Michaelangelo Conte | The Jersey Journal
on September 08, 2015 at 9:51 AM, updated September 08, 2015 at 9:52 AM

Jersey City residents seem ready to ride as bike racks for the city's new Citi Bike bike-share program are being installed around city.

"I think it's a pretty neat idea, and I will use them," said Alex Fitzhugh yesterday morning as he passed the Citi Bike bicycle racks at Hamilton Park in Downtown Jersey City.

Fitzhugh, who recently moved to Jersey City from Tennessee for a job in Manhattan, said, "I'd ride it to the PATH station. I go there every morning, and there's a drop off near the station."

George Bullis was strolling with his beagle Bagel when he said he has his own bike, but he knows that people in Manhattan "definitely use it."

"I think it will increase our property value, too," he added. "The only bad thing is it is going to make it tight on the sidewalk" once the bikes are in their racks. He said a neighbor has already signed up. Read more


Offline MÇA

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Jersey City unveils locations of bike-share stations
« Reply #36 on: 08-05-2015, 12:55pm »


Jersey City unveils locations of bike-share stations
By Terrence T. McDonald | The Jersey Journal
on August 05, 2015 at 12:19 PM, updated August 05, 2015 at 12:36 PM

JERSEY CITY — Nearly every neighborhood in Jersey City will have at least one Citi Bike station, part of an effort to allow every resident in the city to participate in the launch of the bike-share program, city officials said today.

Downtown will have 13 stations, the most of any of the city's six wards, and the Heights will have seven. The Journal Square area will see five — three within a block of the PATH hub — four will go to the West Side and there will be three each in Greenville and Bergen-Lafayette.

Mayor Steve Fulop told The Jersey Journal in a phone interview this morning that city officials pressed Motivate, the company that will operate Citi Bike Jersey City, which launches in September, to locate the 35 bike-share stations throughout the city.

This is a different approach than Motivate has taken in other cities, where stations were initially concentrated in a handful of core areas and expanded out later.

"We wanted each of the areas in the city to have access right from the start," Fulop said. "That was a priority." Read more

Offline MÇA

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Announcement and new website: http://www.citibikejc.com/



Citi to Become Title Sponsor for Jersey City’s Bike Share Program

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
August 4, 2015

Additional sponsors include Horizon, SUEZ North America, CarePoint, and Jersey City Medical Center – Barnabas Health

Program will create new, affordable transportation option for Jersey City and be interoperable with New York City’s Citi Bike program


Jersey City—Mayor Steven M. Fulop and Jay Walder, President & CEO of Motivate, today announced sponsors for Jersey City’s new bike share program launching in September. Citi will be the Title Sponsor, and the bike share program will be named Citi Bike. Citi Bike Jersey City and Citi Bike New York will be interoperable programs, meaning membership to one will entitle riders to the same usage in sister market. Four additional organizations– the Horizon Foundation for New Jersey, SUEZ North America, CarePoint Health and Jersey City Medical Center–Barnabas Health have been named Founding Sponsors. The program’s website www.citibikejc.com launched today as well.

As part of the sponsorship agreements the Title Partner will have their name integrated into the program and exclusive branding on all bikes.  The Founding Partners will have customized benefits that include recognition and advertising at designated stations, recognition on the website and in program materials, and community based events.

The program will launch with 350 bikes at 35 stations, providing a new, environmentally friendly, healthy and affordable 24/7 transportation option for Jersey City. Jersey City has added 22 new miles of bike lanes over the past two years and bike share represents the next big step in creating a more bike-friendly city.

“Jersey City is a diverse community with residents who largely use bikes, mass transit or walk to work and the city’s culture and vibrancy make it the perfect place for bike share,” said Mayor Fulop. “We know what a huge success our bike share program will be and want to thank Citi, the Horizon Foundation, SUEZ North America, CarePoint, and Jersey City Medical Center-Barnabas Health for joining the initiative as they recognize the benefits this will provide the community.”

“We appreciate the dedication of Mayor Fulop, Citi, the Horizon Foundation, SUEZ North America, CarePoint, and Jersey City Medical Center-Barnabas Health to bringing a regionally integrated bike share program to Jersey City,” said Jay Walder, President and CEO of Motivate. “Citi Bike has already proven to be wildly popular in New York City with over 19 million trips in a little over two years. We’re now expanding the reach, making bike share a seamless part of the region’s transportation network.”   

“When we took steps to help make the Citi Bike program a reality in New York, we had high hopes for it, but we never imagined it would have this kind of impact on people’s lives,” said Elyse Lesley, Managing Director, Citi U.S. Consumer and Commercial Banking and CitiMortgage. “Today, we are thrilled to join Mayor Fulop and Motivate to help introduce the program in Jersey City and bring there the wide-ranging benefits of this sustainable, healthy and convenient service.”

“The Horizon Foundation for New Jersey is proud to be a Founding Sponsor and join Mayor Fulop in fulfilling his vision to bring New Jersey’s first bike share program to Jersey City,” said Robert A. Marino, Chairman, Horizon Foundation for New Jersey and Chairman and CEO, Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey. “Horizon cares about improving the health of the residents in the diverse communities we serve, so promoting physical activity through an innovative bike share program will encourage residents and visitors to get their fitness routine into gear.”

“Teaming up with Mayor Fulop and the City of Jersey City to deliver a bike-share program was an easy decision for SUEZ North America,” said Bertrand Camus, CEO of SUEZ North America. “As an environmental company, we strive to support initiatives that will help people think “green” and encourage them to lead a healthier lifestyle for themselves and the planet.”

“As a member of the Jersey City Community we are proud to be a founding sponsor of Citi Bike,” said CarePoint Health System CEO Dennis Kelly. “With a large number of our employees living and working here, we are excited to help improve the quality of life in the city we call home.”

“Jersey City Medical Center is proud to be a sponsor of the Jersey City Bike Share program and to have a bike docking station on our campus.  Bike riding will help reduce traffic congestion and car emissions and, at the same time, provide a healthy transportation alternative,” said Joseph F. Scott FACHE President and CEO – Jersey City Medical Center, a Barnabas Health facility.  “At Barnabas Health, we believe ‘Life is better healthy.’ This program encourages exercise, an important component of our mission for healthier lifestyles. We thank Mayor Fulop for bringing Bike Share to Jersey City and, as a Jersey City resident, I look forward to taking part in this easy and convenient means of transportation.”

Membership sign-ups start August 5th at www.citibikejc.com. Members who sign up before opening day will have access to the program in New York City immediately and ride in Jersey City on the system’s opening day. Pricing across New York and New Jersey will be the same, with an annual membership cost of $149. Members are entitled to unlimited use of the system for individual bike trips of up to 45 minutes. Members using the Citi Bikes for longer periods will be charged a graduated fee. There also will be options for day and weekly memberships.

Corporate memberships are also available. Any Jersey City employer that signs up by October 1st will be designated a charter member, with the opportunity to extend a 50% or 100% subsidy to every employee. More information is available by emailing marketing@citibikejc.com.

The Citi Bike program now joins other regional bike share networks including Hubway, Capital Bike Share and Bay Area Bike Share in providing a transportation network that serves residents across municipal boundaries with one single, seamless membership. Citi Bike in the New York / New Jersey area is the largest bike share program in the United States and one of the largest in the world. Citi Bike riders have taken over 19 million trips on the program in New York since it launched in May 2013.

Offline shahaggy

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JC Bike Share Will Roll Out Citywide
« Reply #34 on: 07-16-2015, 02:31pm »
The city and the company that will run the soon-to-be launched bike-share program won’t yet release many details of Jersey City’s bike-share program, from the precise location of stations to – most importantly – the sponsor that will give the program it’s name and dollars when it rolls out in September.

But one element that has been cemented will make Jersey City’s program unique compared to many other bike shares around the country. Instead of starting in one concentrated neighborhood, Jersey City’s program will launch city wide, with docking stations in all six wards.

New York’s Citibike program, for example, began below 59th Street and in a slice of Brooklyn and is still concentrated in that area. In Boston, it launched solely downtown. Jersey City’s bike share, which will be run by the New York City-based company Motivate, expects to launch with 35 stations for a total of 350 bikes scattered throughout the city.

continue... :bike:
[04:53 PM] Soshin: I don't think I've ever had fig spread Darna but I like figs and they make my sphincter sing power ballads

[12:48 PM] Bobblehead: Yo, you know I'm really happy for you and Ima let you finish, but soshin had one of the best meercat shouts of all time

[10:23 PM] skwirrlking: you submitting darna for beards eating cupcakes - mca?

[03:24 PM] Darna: [03:22 PM] jeht'aimeu: skw, you are climbing up my pole as well... 

[02:28 PM] propscene: I DPON"T MEAN I LOVE YOU DEEP INSIDE AS MUCH AS I LOVE HIM DEEP INSIDE OH GOD

[12:58 PM] nikki: i feel like i should like the opposite of whatever jehu says

Offline littlemissmarker

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Re: Bicycle sharing coming to Jersey City?
« Reply #33 on: 04-05-2015, 01:28am »
Good idea to buy car for 5 k but there's no where to park.

Offline stephen

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Re: Bicycle sharing coming to Jersey City?
« Reply #32 on: 03-31-2015, 02:29pm »
The $5000 is just how they price the hardware, stations, maintenance, software development on a yearly basis. But you're right, only plebeians rely on bodily motion for transportation.

Online fasteddie

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Re: Bicycle sharing coming to Jersey City?
« Reply #31 on: 03-31-2015, 02:27pm »
"The initiative will start with 350 bikes priced at $5,000 apiece"

I still think it's a stupid idea. They could buy 350 decent used cars for $5000 apiece and let people travel in comfort like civilized human beings.

Offline stephen

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Re: Bicycle sharing coming to Jersey City?
« Reply #30 on: 03-31-2015, 02:12pm »
The higher cost could be attributed to figuring out the true cost due to NYC's experiment as well as the increased level of service per the weekend's upgrade?

http://www.streetsblog.org/2015/03/30/citi-bike-installs-new-software-says-more-upgrades-coming-by-summer/

Offline MÇA

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:fulop: pedaling full speed with Jersey City's :bike:-sharing program
By Patrick Villanova | The Jersey Journal
on March 30, 2015 at 6:28 PM, updated March 30, 2015 at 6:30 PM

Jersey City Mayor Steve Fulop is pedaling full speed ahead with his new bike-sharing program.

Fulop, who often bikes 25 miles to and from the George Washington Bridge in the mornings, discussed the city's bike-sharing initiative in the upcoming April 6 issue of The New Yorker.

While Jersey City had originally planned to join Hoboken and Weehawken in creating a regional bike-sharing program, Fulop instead opted to launch his own plan that links with New York's popular Citi Bike system.

"The other two towns were more conscious of the price, because the system to integrate with New York is more expensive," Fulop told the magazine.

The initiative will start with 350 bikes priced at $5,000 apiece, according to magazine, which added that Fulop secured about $2.5 million from sponsors for the first batch of bicycles. Read more

Offline MÇA

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Jersey City one step closer to launching bike-share program with NYC; annual membership estimated at $150
By Patrick McGovern | The Jersey Journal
on January 07, 2015 at 4:17 PM, updated January 07, 2015 at 5:28 PM

Jersey City is now one step closer to launching a bike-share program that will allow members to use New York City’s Citi Bike system, after the program was approved by the City Council Monday.

Brooklyn-based Alta Bicycle Share, which operates the Citi Bike system, was the sole bidder and was awarded the contract to work with the city. The city council voted 8-0 to award the contract to Alta.

City officials said pricing for the Jersey City bike share program will be similar to New York's 6,000-bike Citi Bike system, where an annual membership is $149. Jersey City will start off with approximately 350 bikes and 35 docking stations, with the potential to expand, officials said. Under the agreement Jersey City bike share members can use Citi Bike bicycles.

The Jersey City program will be funded by corporate sponsorship and will come at no cost to taxpayers, officials said.

"Jersey City has one of the fastest-growing biking populations and a community who utilizes bikes and mass transit for commuting to and from work," Jersey City Mayor Steve Fulop said. "We anticipate this program will be one of the most-used in the nation and will develop a national model for a regional, urban bike share system."

Alta will be responsible for all system planning including securing sponsorship and financing; developing the operating team; creating a website and mobile app; assembling and installing the bikeshare equipment; and launching and operating the program, company officials said.

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Offline MÇA

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Citi Bike Looks Across River to Jersey City
« Reply #27 on: 12-17-2014, 08:30pm »
Citi Bike Looks Across River to Jersey City
Proposal by New York City’s Operator Would Start With 350 Bikes
By ANDREW TANGEL
Dec. 16, 2014 9:51 p.m. ET

A new bike-share program that would connect Citi Bike to Jersey City is gaining traction, potentially extending access to the nation’s largest such system to a rapidly gentrifying area across the Hudson River.

Under the proposal, riders next year could dock at least 350 shared bikes at PATH train stations and then hop on Citi Bikes after taking the train into Manhattan. Jersey City’s mayor, Steven Fulop, said he expects the City Council to consider awarding a contract to Citi Bike’s operator, Alta Bicycle Share Inc., in January.

“That is paramount, because as we grow, a lot of our growth is tied to New York City,” Mr. Fulop said. “A lot of people live here and work there, and at the same time you do have people coming across” from New York to Jersey City.

A new bike-share program would put Jersey City among the latest U.S. municipalities rolling out what supporters see as an emerging form of transit that promotes exercise and cuts down on automobile pollution. There were at least three dozen public bike-sharing programs in urban areas across the country earlier this year, up from six in 2010, according to researchers.

Jersey City had sought to form a regional bike share with neighboring Hoboken and Weehawken. But companies behind those plans didn’t find a sponsor to help pay for bikes and docking stations where riders park them ahead of a planned earlier this year.

Alta was the only company that bid in Jersey City’s search for a system compatible with New York City’s bike share of approximately 6,000 bikes.

An Alta spokeswoman declined to comment.

The city’s procurement process ended Friday, and the council’s vote would pave the way for a system that is up and running as early as the summer of 2015, though the timing for a launch remains unclear. In documents filed with the city, Alta said it expected a launch within six months of signing a contract with Jersey City and lining up a sponsorship and financing.

Other questions also remained murky, including what Jersey City’s system would be called. Private sponsors have yet to be identified to pay for the system’s estimated $2.5 million in upfront costs.

Revenue from fees paid by riders and advertisements would fund operations. Mr. Fulop said the city has no plans to kick in taxpayer funds.

Pricing would be comparable to that of Citi Bike, whose annual memberships cost $149 a year, according to Alta documents. Officials said they wanted Citi Bike users to be able to use the Jersey City system and vice versa.

Alta said it expected to have nearly 5,000 annual members and 20,000 infrequent, or “casual,” users in Jersey City by the end of its first year.

A bike share would be another sign of gentrification for Jersey City, a once gritty town of about 250,000 that has seen high rises and boutiques spring up in its downtown in recent decades.

Rodney Morweiser, co-owner of Grove Street Bicycles in downtown Jersey City, said he welcomed a bike share, even if it threatened his rental business. A program would boost the city’s burgeoning cycling culture, help reduce car traffic and might even help expand the market for bicycles, he said.

“It’s definitely something that’s needed,” Mr. Morweiser said. “If I could have done it myself, I would have.”

While Mr. Fulop said companies from the financial, health-care and other sectors have shown strong interest in sponsoring the program, the mayor said he is well-aware of challenges facing bike-share programs around the country. Many have struggled to raise capital and fund their operations.

“We have a good, good chance of really creating a model, successful program,” Mr. Fulop said. “But if I were to tell you today that there’s no concerns from my standpoint, that would be disingenuous.”

Citi Bike had its own financial woes. In October, Alta announced it had agreed to be acquired by investors, including executives of the real-estate giant Related Cos. and the upscale fitness chain Equinox.

With the takeover came an investment into Alta of $30 million as well as a new chief executive: Jay Walder, a former chairman of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Citi Bike is slated to double in size by 2017.

The city’s system has also been the target of complaints from riders who said there were glitches in the software running about 330 stations in parts of Manhattan and Brooklyn. The program’s woes were highlighted last week by an audit spanning its first year released by the office of New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer.

New York City’s system would dwarf the Jersey City program’s size of an initial 350 bikes. That would put it among the smallest systems operated by Alta, in Chattanooga, Tenn. Alta also operates some of the country’s largest systems, including those in Washington, D.C., Boston and Chicago.

Hoboken and Weehawken are still planning to launch their own 300-bike system operated by Bike and Roll NYC, in a launch now slated for March, according to officials in those cities.

In its filing with Jersey City, Alta said it would establish a base of operations in Jersey City, and its staff would have access to the company’s resources in New York.

Jersey City’s bike share program would use software and hardware from 8D Technologies, whose system Alta used in Seattle’s recently launched bike-share.

Offline Soshin

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Re: Bicycle sharing coming to Jersey City?
« Reply #26 on: 09-29-2014, 01:34pm »
$5000 for a bike? For $5000 you could get 50 regular mountain bikes in any department store paying full retail. You could probably get 100 bikes at wholesale. Even if 90 bikes are stolen, you're still ahead. And they wouldn't be stolen if you put a camera on the bike racks and paid one monkey to watch the monitors and call the cops as soon as they see a thug fuckin with the bikes.The Hoboken system uses a $1200 bike that can be locked to a regular bike rack. How does that work and why is it $1200? None of these numbers make any sense to me. When I was a boy, we bought our own bike, or stole one. Why do MY TAX DOLLARS have to be squandered on $5000 bikes for cheapass yuppie hipsters to ride to the PATH so they can go into NYC and make $100K? Oh, the money will be donated for this program and it will cost the taxpayer nothing? My ass it will! Somewhere down the line it will come out of my pocket. Buy your own godamn bike, ya cheap bastard!

+1.  $5000 a bike is idiotic.  #1200 a bike is slightly less idiotic but is still idiotic nonetheless.
"god hates you. you will all go to yuppie hell. in yuppie hell there is no starbucks or hole foods or sushi bar. in yuppie hell you will work 16 hours a day in a bodega. in yuppie hell your car will not start when the sweeper is coming down the street. in yuppie hell your doorman will terrorize you and have sex with your wife or husband...when you are at work....in the bodega. in yuppie hell you will go to the laundromat and lose your last quarter in a broken washing machine. in yuppie hell you will buy all your food and clothing at the 99 cent store. in yuppie hell there are no cell phones, you will use a pay phone. a filthy pay phone".      -   Cat_Man Dude

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Re: Bicycle sharing coming to Jersey City?
« Reply #25 on: 09-29-2014, 11:24am »
$5000 for a bike? For $5000 you could get 50 regular mountain bikes in any department store paying full retail. You could probably get 100 bikes at wholesale. Even if 90 bikes are stolen, you're still ahead. And they wouldn't be stolen if you put a camera on the bike racks and paid one monkey to watch the monitors and call the cops as soon as they see a thug fuckin with the bikes.The Hoboken system uses a $1200 bike that can be locked to a regular bike rack. How does that work and why is it $1200? None of these numbers make any sense to me. When I was a boy, we bought our own bike, or stole one. Why do MY TAX DOLLARS have to be squandered on $5000 bikes for cheapass yuppie hipsters to ride to the PATH so they can go into NYC and make $100K? Oh, the money will be donated for this program and it will cost the taxpayer nothing? My ass it will! Somewhere down the line it will come out of my pocket. Buy your own godamn bike, ya cheap bastard!

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Re: Bicycle sharing coming to Jersey City?
« Reply #24 on: 09-29-2014, 10:24am »
Forgive me if I am missing something but I thought Citibike was turning into a giant money pit.
"god hates you. you will all go to yuppie hell. in yuppie hell there is no starbucks or hole foods or sushi bar. in yuppie hell you will work 16 hours a day in a bodega. in yuppie hell your car will not start when the sweeper is coming down the street. in yuppie hell your doorman will terrorize you and have sex with your wife or husband...when you are at work....in the bodega. in yuppie hell you will go to the laundromat and lose your last quarter in a broken washing machine. in yuppie hell you will buy all your food and clothing at the 99 cent store. in yuppie hell there are no cell phones, you will use a pay phone. a filthy pay phone".      -   Cat_Man Dude

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???



Jersey City snubs North Hudson bike-share program for NYC's Citi Bike system
By The Jersey Journal
on September 29, 2014 at 7:30 AM

Jersey City Mayor Steve Fulop first looked north, but then gazed east across the Hudson and decided that Jersey City would be better served by linking to a bike-sharing system in the Big Apple than starting a new one with Hoboken and Weehawken, according to Saturday's New York Times.

Fulop told the newspaper he sees joining New York City's Citi Bike system as a way of attracting New Yorkers to jobs, restaurants and cultural offerings in Jersey City.

"With Citi Bike," he said, "the benefits go both ways."

"What's most important for me is that folks in the Heights or Greenville, where's there not great access to the PATH, can get to the train, get out on the other side, and then get on a bike," Fulop added.

In February, Hoboken, Jersey City and Weehawken announced they planned to introduce New Jersey's first bike-share network.

Last year, Hoboken launched a pilot project with 25 bikes.

Sometime between February and now, Fulop changed his mind about working with Hoboken and Weehawken.

Weehawken is still rolling with Hoboken.

"We're neighbors, so it's a great way for people to go out to restaurants or shops in either place, as well as an alternative means to get to the ferry," Weehawken Mayor Richard Turner told The Times.

The cost of the two systems is dramatically different.

Because the New York system involves a docking system, each bike costs about $5,000, which means Jersey City might have to offer subsidies if it cannot find enough sponsors to make its program viable, according to The Times.

The Hoboken bikes only cost $1,200 apiece because they can be locked to standard bike racks.

Hoboken and Weehawken are planning to roll out 300 bikes between them by the end of November and Jersey City is hoping to bring 500 to 600 Citi Bikes to its streets by next year, The Times states.

Through a crowd-sourcing initiative, Jersey City and some local organizations recently raised $37,000 to create bike racks around the city.

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Jersey City to join Hoboken, Weehawken in bike-share program
« Reply #22 on: 04-23-2014, 11:48am »
Jersey City to join Hoboken, Weehawken in bike-share program
Print By Mike D'Onofrio/The Jersey Journal
on April 23, 2014 at 9:06 AM, updated April 23, 2014 at 9:07 AM

Jersey City is shifting its bike-share program into a higher gear.

At its caucus meeting on Monday, the Jersey City Council introduced an agreement for how NJ Bikeshare LLC will implement and operate the city’s bike-share, which will be a part of a regional program with Hoboken and Weehawken.

The details of the contract describe how NJ Bikeshare will manage the new program, including how much time will be allotted to repair broken bikes, said Domenick Bauer, aide to Mayor Steve Fulop.

“This is the final installment of this bike-sharing contract process,” Bauer said.

If the contract is approved today by the council at its bi-monthly meeting, the next phase for the bike-share program will be to determine where to place dozens of docking stations around the city.

Bauer said docking stations will be in every ward in the city, while locations will be based on both neighborhood population density and community input.

The city awarded a five-year contract with NJ Bikeshare last month for the bike-share program that will connect Jersey City with Hoboken and Weehawken.

In late February, Hoboken approved its contract for the bike-share program that is expected to be available in the Mile Square City in June.

Bike-share programs have been gaining in popularity in recent years, with a program on the Rutgers-New Brunswick and Princeton University campuses, in Collingswood and one planned for Red Bank.

Bike-share programs are also operating in Washington, D.C., Boston and Denver.

The yearly membership fees for the Jersey City bike-share program will be roughly $90, city officials previously said, but the exact pricing has yet to be determined.

There will be a minimum of 800 bikes placed throughout the three municipalities, with more than 100 docking stations planned.

Under the five-year contract, the three cities will share 10 percent of the profits, NJ.com has reported.

The program is expected to be launched over the summer at no cost to the taxpayers.

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Jersey City vote puts state's first regional bike-share program in motion
By Mike D'Onofrio/The Jersey Journal
on March 13, 2014 at 10:18 AM, updated March 13, 2014 at 10:19 AM

Jersey City put the wheels in motion for the state first regional bike-share program -- one that it will share with Hoboken and Weehawken.

The Jersey City City Council approved a 5-year contract with NJ Bikeshare LLC at its meeting Wednesday to build, operate and maintain a regional bike-sharing system between the three cities along the Hudson River. 

Residents from Jersey City, Hoboken and Weehawken would also be able to give their own input on where best to place the bike stations in their communities in the coming weeks.

The bike-share program will be 'really geared toward residents,' said Councilwoman Candice Osborne.

Bike-share programs have been gaining in popularity recently, with a program on the Rutgers-New Brunswick and Princeton University campuses, in Collingswood and one planned for Red Bank. Bike-share programs are also operating in Washington, D.C., Boston and Denver.

The yearly membership fees for the bike-share program will be roughly $90, said an aide for Mayor Steven Fulop, but the exact pricing has yet to be determined.

The bike-share program will be "really geared toward residents," said Councilwoman Candice Osborne. The pricing model will be "affordable for residents to use as their form of transportation."

There will be a minimum of 650 bikes placed throughout the three cities, with at least 300 bikes in 30 locations throughout Jersey City.

Under the 5-year contract, the three municipalities would share 10 percent of the profits, NJ.com has reported. The program is expected to be launched over the summer at no cost to the taxpayers, Jersey City officials said.

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More on the bikes themselves. Interesting, this "smart lock" technology.



Hoboken, Jersey City & Weehawken To Launch Regional Bike Share System
Hoboken, NJ - Wednesday, February 19th, 2014

The cities of Hoboken, Jersey City and Weehawken are partnering to launch a regional bike share system in the summer of 2014 that will be the largest next-generation bike share system in North America. The system will feature 800 smart-bikes, 50 bike stations, and 2 full-service pavilions at no cost to the cities.

“Bike sharing is an affordable, sustainable, and convenient transportation option,” said Hoboken Mayor Dawn Zimmer. “We are excited to partner with leading innovators to bring this next-generation system to our residents, businesses and visitors at no cost to taxpayers. I am proud to build upon our successful pilot bike share program and work with our neighbors in Jersey City and Weehawken to create a regional system.”

Jersey City Mayor Steven M. Fulop was equally enthusiastic: “We’re proud to take this step toward a greener, more bike friendly Jersey City. Providing a new transportation option throughout the city while simultaneously reducing pollution, traffic congestion and demand for parking is a home run, especially given that it won’t cost the taxpayers a cent. We believe this system will be a model for others throughout the nation.”

“We are very excited to participate in the bike share program with Hoboken and Jersey City,” said Weehawken Councilwoman Rosemary Lavagnino. “This program will allow residents to leave their cars at home while still giving them access to Weehawken and their neighboring communities.”

The program will be operated by Bike and Roll, the largest bike rental company in the United States, and will use bicycle technology manufactured by Nextbike, a leading operator and supplier of bike sharing systems with over 17,000 bicycles in 60 cities in 14 countries. E3Think is the economic, strategy and planning partner for the consortium, and investment capital will be provided by P3 Global Management, a smart city investment firm.

“Bike and Roll is excited to have been selected to operate this cutting edge bicycle sharing system for Hoboken, Jersey City and Weehawken,” said Chris Wogas, President of Bike and Roll. “Together with our partners, we are bringing a technologically advanced network of bikes to these cities with zero cost to taxpayers. This is truly a value added program for the cities, its residents and visitors.”

The system will feature “smart bikes,” the next generation of bike share technology. Traditional bike sharing systems rely on a “smart dock” approach for storing bicycles, which requires expensive infrastructure for docking stations. The “smart lock” approach relies on bicycles with built-in locks and communications equipment, providing increased flexibility at a fraction of the cost of traditional systems.

“The time is right to introduce an economic and flexible bike sharing program made in Germany to the USA,” said Ralf Kalupner, founder and managing director of nextbike GmbH. “Bike sharing needs to be economic and that’s what we have proven for the last 10 years.”

The Nextbike Cruiser Comfort bike features a 7-gear shift, puncture-resistant tires, integrated LED lights with stand-light function, hub dynamo, kickstand, basket, bell, mudguard, chain guard, hand and coaster brakes, and height-adjustable seat.


“Bike share is the core of new urban mobility for cities around the world,” said Tom Glendening, President of E3Think. “In contrast to the expensive technology in some markets, Nextbike’s low cost, flexible smart-bike technology offers a very, very positive future. This bike share program could very well be a model for cities across the globe.”

Revenue sources for the program will include sponsorships, advertising, and user fees, and the cities will receive a percentage of profits after capital expenditures have been recouped.

“We see bike share programs as a cornerstone of economically and socially healthy cities,” said Jim Campbell, CEO of P3GM. “We are thrilled to have been selected by Jersey City, Hoboken and Weehawken to bring this enormous benefit to their citizens, tourists and students alike.”

Pricing options will include annual, weekly and daily memberships. Annual memberships will include free use for the first 45 minutes of each ride. Customers will be able to register online or at solar-powered kiosks. Members will be able to rent a bicycle via a customer card, mobile application (iOS and Android) or phone call via an interactive voice response system.

The two full-service pavilions, to be located in Hoboken and Jersey City, will include a bike share station, conventional bike rental, helmets and safety support, biking equipment, and tourist information.

The contract award requires the approval of the Councils of the three cities.

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Re: Three N.J. Cities Eye Bike-Sharing
« Reply #19 on: 03-11-2014, 03:16pm »
Liz Geller, 49, who recently moved to Jersey City from New York City, said she would rather not have one right outside her home, though she would likely use the bike-share for errands or trips to Hoboken.

"There's too many in Manhattan. Sometimes they get a little bit overwhelming," said Ms. Geller, a project manager at a publishing company. "They're just ugly."


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Re: Three N.J. Cities Eye Bike-Sharing
« Reply #19 on: 03-11-2014, 03:16pm »